Military Store Department in New Zealand 1857-1870

“I wish to thank all would have contributed to the writing of this article, and in particular Peter Stout and Paul Hardy and Martin Wharton”

During the New Zealand Wars that fell between 1840 and 1870, responsibility for the provision of Logistical support to the Imperial Forces in New Zealand fell to two organisations; The Commissariat whose duty was to keep the soldier well fed and the Military Store Department whose function was to keep the soldier well and comfortably clad and amply supplied with the munitions of war. The smaller of the two organisations the activities of the Military Store Department have been overshadowed by the much larger and more well-known Commissariat. With its origins with the Board of Ordnance, who sent representatives from their office in New South Wales to the colony of New Zealand in 1840. The Military Store Department would provide what is now known as Ordnance support to the Imperial Forces until their departure in 1869, and on the completion of the final administrative clean-up, the last representative of the Military Store Department departed New Zealand in 1870. This article is not intended to be a detailed history of the Military Store Department, but an introduction of the organisation and its personnel and a point of reference for further research.

Board of Ordnance
The Arms of the Board of Ordnance. UK national archives

The origins of the Military Store Department lie with the Board of Ordnance, which under the Master General of the Ordnance existed between 1597 and 1855. The Master General of the Ordnance had a dual civilian and military role; the military function as commander of the Artillery and the Engineers, and a civil role, as head of the Ordnance Department, with responsibility for stores, lands, geographical and geological survey, defensive works, barracks, military hospitals, factories and contracts. During 1792 the Board of Ordnance established two distinct departments to support the Army; the “Storekeepers” and the “Ordnance Field Train, the officers of the latter were called Commissaries of Ordnance, and as such was employed during the period of the Crimean war.[1] The Board of Ordnance had due to the logistical failures of the Crimean war, was abolished in 1855 and its functions placed under the supervision of the War Office while reformation of the British Army’s administrative system took place. In 1857 the two services were amalgamated to form the Military Store Department.[2]

The story of the Military Store Department in New Zealand begins in the Colony of New South Wales when in 1836 the Board of Ordnance established a presence in the Australian Colony. At the time the commissariat (part of the civil administration) was responsible for general supplies and storekeeping with the Brigade Major (Military) accountable for the guns and gunpowder. On 1 January 1836, these functions were transferred from the Commissariat to the Board of Ordnance (Ordnance Storekeeper) and the Office of the Colonial Storekeeper. Although there was a separation of duties between the Board of Ordnance and the Colonial Storekeeper both had responsibility for guns and gunpowder and shared premises and personnel.[3]  Located in George Street North, The Ordnance Storekeeper’s Department under the leadership of storekeeper Richard Rogers; included as his staff his assistant, Percival Wilkinson; and five clerks; John MacDonald, Richard Rogers, William Plummer, Joseph Osbertus Hamley, and Thomas Lawry.[4]

With the establishment of New Zealand as a dependency of New South Wales, the New Zealand colonial administration came from within the ranks of the New South Wales administration, including the Colonial Storekeeper. The Colonial Storekeepers office was included in the First wave of administrators to arrive with Governor William Hobson in January 1840.[5] Mr Charles Hook Gordon Logie of the Sydney based Colonial Storekeepers was appointed on 15 January 1840 to hold the appointment of Colonial Storekeeper in Hobsons administration.[6] The Colonial Storekeeper reported to the Colonial Secretary and was responsible for providing the local colonial militia with arms and accoutrements but had no responsibility for Imperial troops. Imperial troops in New Zealand were the responsibility of the Board of Ordnance. Stores and services provided to the Colonial Storekeeper from Board of Ordnance stocks were on a “repayment” basis, an arrangement that would remain in place until the withdrawal of Imperial troops in 1870.

In April 1840 a detachment of 30 rank and file of the 80th Regiment of the British Army arrived from Sydney for service in New Zealand on board HMS Buffalo.[7] Accompanying them was a representative of the Board of Ordnance to cater for their logistical needs, establishing an Imperial Ordnance presence that would remain in New Zealand until 1870.[8] Detachments of the 80th Regiment later deployed to Auckland where under the direction of George Graham of the Ordnance Department they undertook construction of Fort Britomart.[9]

As the strength of Imperial Forces increased and became more of a permanent feature of the early New Zealand colonial landscape, the Board of Ordnance extended its reach into New Zealand from 1842. First establishing an office in Auckland and later Wellington with the responsibility for the construction and maintenance of barracks and ensuring the provision of Imperial military units in New Zealand with munitions and that they remained comfortably furnished with uniforms and necessities.[10]

The Auckland Office of Ordnance located in Princes Street, was under the management of Mr William Plummer,[11] with storage facilities divided between a bombproof magazine at the Mount Albert Barracks and an ordnance store at Fort Britomart.[12]

The Wellington Office of Ordnance, with Mr Joseph Osbertus Hamley as the Acting Ordnance Storekeeper had a magazine at Mount Cook and stone warehouse on Lambton Quay and later a warehouse in Farish Street.[13]

Farish Street
[Park, Robert] 1812-1870. Attributed works: [Sketches showing the damage to buildings sustained in the 1848 Wellington earthquake] 1848. Reference number: PUBL-0050-01. Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand, must be obtained before any re-use of this image. The impact of the 1848 earthquake on rigid constructions of stone and brick may be seen from these sketches of that time.

The great earthquake of 1848 which changed the landscape of Wellington also severely damaged the ordnance stores located in the Manners/Farish Street area leading to the granting of 13 acres of land to the Board of Ordnance in what would become the military reserve of Mount Cook.[14]  After the earthquake, Hamley set up an office in Willis Street and continued to use the Farish Street warehouse until 1855 when advertised as the “largest and most capacious in Wellington, and being in the centre of the business part of the town” advertised the Farish Street premises for sale.[15]

Plan of Mount Cook Barracks, as planned c.1845 and largely as built by 1852.

In December 1852 it was announced that the Master General of Ordnance had made the following promotions and appointments in the Ordnance Department, In New Zealand; [16]

  • William Plummer, Esq, to be Deputy Ordnance Storekeeper and Barrack Master at Auckland; and
  • Joseph Osbertus Hamley, Esq, to be Deputy Ordnance Storekeeper and Barrack Master at Wellington.[17]

On 4  March 1859, at the age of 39 years, Plummer passed away, resulting in Hamley moving from Wellington and assumed charge of all Ordnance operations in New Zealand.[18]

Following the panic of the Crimean war, and the abolishment of the Board of Ordnance, the Board’s civil officers, were reorganised into a new organisation called the Military Store Department on 1 February 1857. [19], under the title of MilitaryStore Officers, the gradings being:

  • Principal MilitaryStorekeeper and Military Storekeeper, both ranking as Lieutenant Colonel,
  • Deputy Military Storekeeper ranked as a Major, and
  • Assistant ranked as Captain.

The formation of the Military Store Department was one of many organisational reforms were undertaken to modernise and make the administration of the army more effective.[20] [21]The changes soon filtered through to the colonies and the existing Ordnance organisations adapted to the new structures accordingly. Further changes occurred during 1861 with the issuing of Royal Warrants reorganising the Military Store Department and improving the position of the officers.[22] [23] The Royal Warrants granted commissions to the officers of the Military Store Department, [24]  organised into five grades:[25]

  • Principal Superintendent of Stores, ranked as Colonel,
  • Superintendent of Stores; ranked as Lieutenant Colonel,
  • Deputy Superintendent of Stores; ranked as Major,
  • Assistant Superintendent of Stores; ranked as Captain,
  • Deputy Assistant Superintendent of Stores; ranked as Lieutenant.

After some initial conflict in the mid-1840’s New Zealand settled into a period of relative peace, with underlying tensions between Maori and the settlers remaining, resulting in conflict erupting in the Taranaki in 1860. The dispute led to an escalation of Imperial troop levels so that by Mach 1864 the strength of Colonial and Imperial forces in New Zealand had grown from a few hundred in the 1840s, to at its peak a  force of about 18000, including; [26][27]

  • Royal Navy with Royal Marines
  • Ten Infantry Battalions,
  • Two Batteries of the Royal Artillery,
  • Royal Engineers,
  • Military Train,
  • Commissariat Staff Corps,
  • Commissariat Transport Corps,
  • Army Medical Department,
  • Purveyors Department,
  • Military Store Department,
  • Colonial Defence Force
    • Cavalry
    • Forest Rangers
  • Various Colonial Militia, Volunteer and Military Settler units, Including the;
    • Auckland Militia
    • Waikato Militia
  • Pro-British Māori iwi (Kupapa)

Expanding to meet the demands of the growing Imperial Forces the New Zealand branch of the Military Store Department included the following staff;[28] [29]

Assistant Military Storekeeper/ Assistant Superintendent of Stores/ Deputy Superintendent of Stores

  • William Plummer, 1857 – 1859.[30]
  • Joseph Osbertus Hamley,1857 – 1870.[31]
  • C. Macduff, February 1861 – May 1866. [32]
Joseph Osbertus Hamley
Joseph Osbertus Hamley, circa 1860s. Photographer unidentified. Alexander Turnbull Library Reference Number: PA1-q-250-25-1 http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=27060

Acting Deputy Assistant Superintendent of Stores

  • Edward Foster Holden, from 1864.[33]

Deputy Assistant Superintendent of Stores

  • J Ingram,  March1861-1862. [34] [35] [36]
  • Joseph Michael Rainsford, 1862-1864.[37]
  • A.R Tribe, 1861 -1866[38]
  • William Marvin, 1862 – 1867.[39]
  • William Sidney Haldane, March1864 – 1868.[40] [41]
  • T Timbrell, March1864 – 1866.[42]
  • James White, March1864 -1866.[43]
  • W. B Le Gyet,1863-1866.
  • Henry Potter, 1863 -1867.[44]
  • Wilmot Holworthy, 1867-1867.
  • Dominick O’Loghlan MacDermott, 1867-1867.
  • T.G Stack, 1867-1867.
  • John Fullarton Beatson, 1867 – 1868,[45]

Other staff that were known to have worked as part of the MSD were;

  • Mr Michael Field,[46] [47]
  • Mr Maurice Norman Bower, 1857-1862 [48] [49]
  • Mr Gorrie,[50]
  • Mr Kerr, [51]
  • Edward Smith.[52]
  • David Evitt, [53]
  • Sergeant Alexander Stewart, 1861- 1864 [54]
  • Armourer Sergeant John Smith. [55]
  • John Fahy, [56]

Store conductors

Store Conductors were Non-Commissioned Officers selected from the Royal Artillery and units of the line based on their superior intelligence and exemplary conduct. [57] Reinforcing their knowledge of stores duties and procedures by attending a six-week course at the Tower and Woolwich Arsenal prepared and confirmed their appointment as Stores Conductors.[58] Known Stores Conductors in New Zealand were;[59]

  • 3242 Sergeant -Master Gunner John Bates, Royal Artillery, 5 Mar 1861 – 20 Jun 1866,
    • Served: Waitara, Te Arei Pa and Auckland,
  • 3153 Sergeant 3rd Class Benjamin Evans, Royal Artillery, 1861 – 1866,
    • Transferred to MSSC 29 Jun 68
  • 687 Sergeant Caleb Bell, Royal Artillery, 1861 – 1866,
  • 2787 Sergeant John Brown, Royal Artillery,1 Aug 1861 – 14-Nov-66,
  • 1439 Sergeant William Brunkard, Royal Artillery, 1861 – 1866,[60]
  • 3074 Sergeant Hugh Carlin, Royal Artillery, 5 Mar 1864 – 1866,
    • Served Waikato and Wanganui,
  • 1080 Sergeant Archie Hood, Royal Artillery, 1861 – 1866,
    • Served Taranaki,
  • 1313 Sergeant Master Gunner Walter Kelsall, Royal Artillery, 1861 – 1866,
    • Served Auckland and Shepard Bush,18th Regt
  • Sergeant Alexander Stewart, Royal Artillery,[61]
    • In charge of the powder magazine at Albert Barracks from 1961 to 1964

From 1857 the military establishment of the Military Store Department was only officers, with civilians and soldiers seconded from other Corps or Regiments as required. The formation of a Military Store Staff Corps as an unformed branch of the British military had been under discussion for some time, with Major Hamley strongly recommending the creation of such as Corps in 1864.[62] Established by royal warrant in 1865 the Military Store Staff Corps created an establishment of soldiers to complement the officers of the Military Store Department.[63] Given that by the time of the granting of the royal warrant, and the establishment of the Military Store Staff Corps in 1866,[64] the Imperial forces in New Zealand were starting to wind down operations and depart New Zealand; it is currently unknown if Major Hamley was able to have his staff transferred to the Military Store Staff Corps.

ourheritagemediaoriginalfc5f46c2afbfb5e53b76cef5c40974d2
Williams, E. A. (Edward Arthur), 1824-1898, “Fort Britomart. Auckland.,” ourheritage.ac.nz | OUR Heritage, accessed July 28, 2018, http://www.otago.ourheritage.ac.nz/items/show/4884.

Uniforms of the Military Store Department

The Army Dress Regulations of 1864 details the specifications for the uniforms of the Military Store Department.[65]

Coat—Tunic, blue, single-breasted, with scarlet collar, cuffs and slash on sleeve. The collar rounded off in front; cuff round, two and three-quarter inches deep, and ten and a half round; slashed flap- on sleeve six inches long and two and a quarter inches wide, with three loops of halfinch lace, staff pattern, and uniform buttons; eight buttons in front at equal distances. The skirt ten and a half inches deep for an officer 5 feet 9 inches in height, with a variation of half an inch, longer or shorter”, for every inch of difference in the height of the wearer; blue flap on the skirt behind, ten inches deep, two buttons on flap, and one on waist, with three loops of halfinch lace. The coat, collar, cuffs, and flaps edged with scarlet cloth, quarter-inch, and the skirts lined with scarlet.

Distinctions of Rank according to the relative ranks in the army. Principal Superintendent of Stores, and Superintendent of Stores, the latter, after five years’ standing as such, as Colonel; the collar laced round the top and bottom, with a crown and star at each end of collar.

Superintendent of Stores, under five years’ standing, as Lieutenant-Colonel, same lace as Principal Superintendent, with a crown at each end of collar.

Deputy-Superintendent of Stores, as Major; the same lace, with a star at each end of collar.

Assistant- Superintendent of Stores, as Captain; the lace round top only of collar, a crown and star at each end.

Deputy-Assistant Superintendent of Stores, as Lieutenant; the same lace as Assistants, with a crown at each end of collar.

Officers ranking with Field Officers to have two rows of half-inch lace round the top of the cuff, and an edging of the same on the sleeve and skirt flaps, and down the edge of the skirts behind.

Officers under that rank to have one row of lace round the cuff, none on the skirts, and loops only on the skirt and sleeve flaps.

Lace gold, staff pattern, half an inch in width.

Buttons—gilt, with the crown and “Military Store Staff ” raised thereon.

Hat—cocked, the fan on back part nine inches, the front seven inches and a half, each corner five inches, uniform buttons gold lace loop, and tassels of gold crape fringe, with crimson underneath. Feather—black and white, cock-tail; top white, and bottom black, five and a half inches long, mushroom shaped.

Stock—black silk.

Trousers—blue cloth, with gold lace one and three-quarter inches broad, staff pattern, down outward seam.

Boots—Wellington.

Spurs—screw, yellow metal, crane neck, two inches long for Officers ranking with Field Officers; steel for Officers under that rank drawing forage.

Sword—as for Officers of Infantry.

Scabbard—brass, for Officers ranking with Field Officers, steel for all other ranks.

Sword-Knot—crimson and gold, with acorn tassel.

Sword-Belt—for Officers ranking with Field Officers, black morocco leather, one inch and a half wide, with two rows of gold embroidery in a scroll. Slings, embroidered on one side; plain gilt buckles to slings. For Officers under that rank, plain black morocco, without embroidery.

Plate —round gilt clasp, with V.R., surmounted in silver upon the centre-piece, and ” Military Store Staff” with a laurel, also in silver, on outer circle.

Frock-Coat—blue, double-breasted, with stand-up collar, rounded off in front ; cuffs and lapels all blue, cuff, ten and a half inches round, and two and three-quarter inches deep ; slashed flap on sleeve five and a quarter inches long, and one and a half inch wide, with three small uniform buttons, two rows of uniform buttons down the front, eight buttons in each row at equal distances. Flaps on skirt behind ten inches deep, with two buttons on flap and one on waist; the skirt lined with black, and seventeen inches deep for an Officer five feet nine inches in height, with a variation of half an inch, longer or shorter, for each inch of difference in the height of the wearer. The Officers ranking with Field Officers to have the badge of their rank (as crown or star) embroidered in gold at each end of the collar. The collars of all other Officers to be plain.

Waistcoat—blue, single-breasted, with uniform buttons, plain gold braid round collar, seams and pockets, finished with a crow’s foot at each end of pocket.

Undress Trousers—blue cloth, with scarlet stripe, one and three-quarter inches in width down outer seam, for Principal Superintendents of Stores and Superintendents after five years’ service.

For other ranks—blue, with two scarlet welts down each outward seam.

Forage-Cap—for Principal Superintendents of Stores and Superintendents after five years’ standing, blue cloth, with embroidered peak and gold lace band, staff’ lace, one and three-quarters inches in width, gold netted button on top.

For other ranks —blue cloth, with plain leather peak and chin-strap, with two rows of gold lace five-eighths of an inch wide, staff pattern, for band, showing scarlet between the lines, gold netted button on top.

Shell-Jacket— blue, with scarlet facings and uniform buttons.

Cloak—blue pattern, as for Officers of Infantry, with uniform buttons.

Horse Furniture—as for Medical Officers.

Infrastructure

Commensurate with the growth of the Imperial Forces, The Military Store Department, alongside the much larger Commissariat [66] [67] had kept pace and by 1864 Fort Britomart and Albert Barracks in Auckland had become the central storage and distribution depot (Logistic Hub in modern terms) for all the Imperial troops stationed throughout New Zealand.[68] The Military Store Department infrastructure in Fort Britomart consisted of the following; [69]

Fort Britomart 1860s
A Scene at Fort Britomart, Auckland, 1860s. Shows soldiers from the Imperial; the Sir George Grey Special Collections in the Auckland City Library
  • No 1 Store – A generous 65ft x 60ft building with an estimated storage capacity of 1000 Utilised at the “Receiving Store,” it is the store that all inwards goods are received, sorted and classified before distribution to customer units or placed into storage into other stores for later use.
  • No 2 Store – A bulk store for all manner of goods from scythes to swords, including in-numerable bales of grey blankets
  • No 3 Store – Clothing and necessities store for regimental for the 13 different corps in the colony. At the time uniforms were provided to men at one-third of the cost for which they were available from civilian vendors.
  • No 4 Store – Hospital stores and manner of necessaries, comforts or luxuries for sick soldiers.
  • No 5 Store – The delivery store where goods as pocked and addressed for the delivery to customers. Also serving as a store for trophy weapons captured during the war. Captured weapons were all carefully labelled, waiting to be claimed by the men who secured them when the war was over.
  • No 6 Store – Armoury for artillery stores and small arms such as rifles.
  • No 7 Store – Used for artillery fittings for 6Lb and 12Lb Armstrong batteries of the Imperial forces.
  • No 8 Store – The packing store, where tradesmen such as carpenters and painters prepare and pack goods for delivery.
  • No 9 Store – Reception store for camp equipage returned from regiments, and for its inspection and refurbishment to make it ready for reissue. This store also included an armourers workshop responsible for the repair and cleaning of rifles, swords, and other warlike implements. This building also included quarters for the twenty-five men of the Military Store Department
  • Magazines – Located in Albert Barracks and consisting of several buildings surrounded by a stone wall, the magazines held the entire supply of ammunition for the army in New Zealand. Stocks were held as either prepared cartridges (four and a half million rounds in March 1864) or as components such as shot and powder. Constructed of arched brick the magazines resembled strong rooms with the ammunition packed in cases and barrels on racks on each side with a narrow passage between the stock. Designed to be intrinsically safe within the walls of the magazine, with all nails and tools were made from copper so that every precaution was taken to prevent sparks and explosions. Magazine keepers were hand-picked, and the slightest sign of unsteadiness or neglect of duty resulted in instant dismissal.
Fort Britomart Map

Military Store Department operations were not only restricted to Auckland but across the country were ever Imperial troops were serving. Embedded in Regiments, Stores Conductors provided the link between Regimental Quartermasters and the Store Department.  Hamley and his deputy Macduff would spend a considerable time in the field supervising stores distribution. An example being in March 1864 when McDuff personally oversaw the distribution of blankets, clothing and necessities to troops and Te Awamutu during the Waikato campaign.[70] During the Taranaki Campain, the strength of the Military Store Department in New Plymouth in June 1863 was 1 Staff and 3 Sergeants.[71]

By 1866 the conflict in New Zealand had reached a stage where colonial forces were conducting the bulk of military operations, resulting in a drawdown and withdrawal of Imperial units. As the Imperial commitment decreased with the departure of five Imperial Regiments in 1866, the Military Store Department also had to reduce and optimise its operations. The reduction of troops necessitated the closing of its provincial Depots such as the Depot in Whanganui in March of 1867, and its stores returned to Auckland.[72] [73] With the departure of four more regiments in 1867, the closure of the Tauranga Depot soon followed.[74]  The final Imperial Regiment would depart New Zealand in February 1869.[75] [76]

The dismantling of Fort Britomart had commenced in January 1869, with all the military content of Fort Britomart and Albert Barracks belonging to the Imperial Government, such as guns, ammunition and stores shipped to the United Kingdom on the SS Himalaya. [77] With the withdrawal of Imperial Forces completed by July 1870,[78] and the full responsibility for defence matters handed over to the New Zealand Colonial Defence Force.[79] Defence store-keeping responsibility was handed over to the Colony’s Defence Stores under the control of the Colonial Storekeeper, Captain John Mitchell.[80] [81]  Transfers of equipment on a cost recovery basis to the New Zealand Forces was facilitated, with the surplus was either disposed of by tender or redistributed around the empire. [82] [83]

Fort Britomart 1860s
A Scene at Fort Britomart, Auckland, 1860s. Shows soldiers from the Imperial; the Sir George Grey Special Collections in the Auckland City Library

After 32 years of Colonial service, Hamley with the exception of the Imperial officer remaining to pay pensioners was the last remaining Imperial Officer in New Zealand to return to England.[84]  Hamley would continue to be employed in Ordnance related services, serving in Ireland, Chatham. The War Office, Dover, and Aldershot retiring with the honorary rank of Major General.

In 1870 the Military Store Department, the Commissariat and the Military Train were amalgamated into one organisation called the Control Department. From the perspective of the Military Store Department, it was a disastrous and ill thought out experiment in combined logistics, leading to the amalgamation been reversed in 1876 with the Military Store Department renamed the Ordnance Store Department, which in turn would after several name changes became the Royal Army Ordnance Corps in 1918.[85]

In conclusion, the Military Store Department served with distinction during the New Zealand wars. The story of the Military Store Department is the story of Major Joseph Osbertus Hamley. Hamley progressed through the ranks from being an 18-year-old in the Ordnance Department in Sydney to Deputy Ordnance Storekeeper in Wellington in 1847 and then the head of the Military Store Department during the crucial war years of the 1860’s. Newspaper articles of the period are full of praise for Hamley and his skilful leadership of his department and few if any find any fault with him. This article provides an introduction into Hamleys Military Store Department, which as an organisation unfairly overshadowed by the much larger and more well-known Commissariat is deserving of having its story told and further research is required to understand the full story of this exceptional man and the organisation he managed.

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes:

[1] Robert Curran, “Ordnance Stores and the Ordnance Storekeeper in the Colony of New South Wales,”  http://users.tpg.com.au/borclaud/ranad/ordnance_storekeeper.html#imp.

[2] A.H. Fernyhough, History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1920-1945 (Royal Army Ordnance Corps, 1958), IX.

[3] Curran, “Ordnance Stores and the Ordnance Storekeeper in the Colony of New South Wales”.

[4] ” Old Sydney,” Truth (Sydney, NSW: 1894 – 1954), 4 August 1912.

[5] “Government Notice,” Sydney Herald, 3 July 1840.

[6] “Letter from Charles Logie Colonial Storekeeper, Bay of Islands to Willoughby Shortland, Esquire, Acting Colonial Secretary Item Id R23629593, Record No 1840/76 (Wellington: Archives New Zealand),”  (1840).

[7] MNZM  Gerald J Elliott, “British Regiments in New Zealand 1840-1847,”  http://ellott-postalhistorian.com/articles/80th-96th-99th-Regiments.pdf.

[8] Major J.S Bolton, A History of the Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (Trentham: RNZAOC, 1992).

[9] Una Platts, The Lively Capital, Auckland 1840-1865 (Christchurch: Avon Fine Prints, 1971), Non-fiction, 24.

[10] 158Adam Davis, “The Imperial Garrison in New Zealand, 1840-1870 with Particular Reference to Auckland” (University of Bedfordshire, 2004).

[11] “Tender for Supply of Straw,” New Zealander,  Volume 1, Issue 41, 14 March 1846.

[12] “Communication with the Interior “, New Zealander, Volume 2, Issue 69, 26 September 1846.

[13] “Sealed Tenders,” Wellington Independent, Volume II, Issue 149 1847.

[14] “Pukeahu National War Memorial Park, Law and Order and the Military,”  https://mch.govt.nz/pukeahu/park/pukeahu-history-7.

[15] “Freehold Allotment of Land,” Lyttelton Times, Volume V, Issue 259,, 25 April 1855.

[16] “Promotions and Appointments,” New Zealand Spectator and Cooks Strait Guardian, Volume VIII, Issue 772, 25 December 1852

[17] Hamley has first arrived in New Zealand in 1847 as the ordnance Clerk in Wellington.

[18] “Projected Departure of Mr Hamley,” Wellington Independent, Volume XXV, Issue 3017, 9 July 1870.

[19] War Officer Circular 139 Dated 15 September 1857. J.M. War office Bannatyne, Royal Warrants, Circular, General Orders and Memoranda, Issued by the War Office and Horse Guards, Aug. 1856- July 1864 (1864), 302.

[20] Brigadier A H Fernyhough, A Short History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps (First Edition)

(RAOC Trust 1965), 14.

[21] Arthur Forbes, A History of the Army Ordnance Services (London: The Medici society, ltd., 1929), 149.

[22] “Commissions Granted to Officers Serving in the Military Store Department,” London Gazette No 22567, 19 November 1861, 4642-45.

[23] “Military Store Detachment – Promotions,” London Gazette No 22545, 18 July 1862, 3584.

[24] Fernyhough, History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1920-1945, ix.

[25] Forbes, A History of the Army Ordnance Services, 41.

[26] James Belich, The New Zealand Wars and the Victorian Interpretation of Racial Conflict (Auckland, New Zealand: Auckland University Press, 2015 This edition 2015, 2015), Bibliographies, Non-fiction, 125-26.

[27] Davis, “The Imperial Garrison in New Zealand, 1840-1870 with Particular Reference to Auckland,” 79.

[28] Colonel H.G Hart, “Hart’s Army Lists – 1839-1915,” National Library of Scotland,, https://digital.nls.uk/british-military-lists/archive/100739612.

[29] “Matters Military “, New Zealand Herald, Volume I, Issue 247, 27 August 1864.

[30] Plummer had arrived in New Zealand in 1842 as an Ordnance Clerk in Auckland from the New South Wales Ordnance Office.  Passed away 4 March 1859, at the age of 39 years

[31] Served in New Zealand from 1847 until 1870. Remained in Government service after returning to the United Kingdom and retired after more than forty-two years of service as Commissary General with the honorary rank of Major General.Una Platts, Nineteenth Century New Zealand Artists: A Guide & Handbook (Christchurch, N.Z.: Avon Fine Prints, 1980, 1980), Bibliographies, Non-fiction, Collective biography.

[32] Second in command of the department who volunteered his services for New Zealand at the beginning of the war. Promoted to Assistant Superintendent of Stores on 2 August 1862

[33] Never appointed D.A.S.S, was only appointed acting D.A.S.S locally after the death of Rainsford.

[34] Departed England on the Norwood January 1861. “Continuation of Journal of Events to Jan 19,” Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle, Volume XX, Issue 9, 26 January 1861.

[35] Arrived 6 March 1861 on the Norwood “Shipping Intelligence, Poort of Auckland,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XVII, Issue 1380, 5 March 1861.

[36] Joined the MSD at Hong Kong November 1862  “Martime Record,” New Zealander, Volume XVIII, Issue 1741, 12 November 1862.

[37] Passed away 15 April 1864 “Military Funeral,” New Zealander, Volume XX, Issue 2104, 30 April 1864.

[38] Departed United Kingdom in the Ship African to take charge of the military stores on the outward voyage to New Zealand April 1861 “English Shipping,” Wellington Independent Volume XVI, Issue 1518, 30 April 1861.

[39]  In 1864 Marvin was employed in the demands office, responsible for maintaining the proper proportion of stores to meet the requirements of the army, either by obtaining the stores from England or purchasing them in the local market. Left the department in 1866 and returned to the UK “Military Items,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXII, Issue 3101, 25 June 1867.

[40] Arrived on Ship Golden City with Timbrell and White March 1864 “Naval and Military Extracts,” Colonist, Volume VII, Issue 665, 11 March 1864.

[41] “Military Items,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXIV, Issue 3390, 28 May 1968.

[42] “Naval and Military Extracts.”

[43] Ibid.

[44] In charge of Issues, joined the department from Tasmania at the beginning of the war, completed service with the department in 1867″Military Items.”

[45] completed service with the department in 1868 “Military Intelligence,” Taranaki Herald, Volume XVI, Issue 816, 14 March 1868.

[46] Clerk in the Military Store Department. 1860 – Chapman’s New Zealand Almanac – New Zealand Official Directory,  (The University of Auckland Library, 1860), 164.

[47] In control of the finance department. “Matters Military “, New Zealand Herald, Vol 1 Issue247, 27 August 1864.

[48] Clerk in the Military Store Department. 1860 – Chapman’s New Zealand Almanac – New Zealand Official Directory, 164.

[49] Bower arrived in Auckland in 1857, joined the Military Store Department, in which he remained until the outbreak of the Waikato War. The Cyclopedia of New Zealand. Vol. 6. Taranaki, Hawkes Bay, Wellington Provincial Districts: Industrial, Descriptive, Historical, Biographical Facts, Figures, Illustrations,  (Cyclopedia Company, 1908), 308.

[50] Department ledger keeper. “Matters Military “.

[51] Performed the general duties of a clerk. Ibid.

[52] Armourer attached to the MSD at Britomart Barracks 1863 “Police Court,” New Zealander, Volume XIX, Issue 1897, 18 June 1863.

[53] Gunsmith working as a contractor to the MSD, at Britomart Barracks 1863. Ibid.

[54]  In Charge of the Powder Magazine Mount Albert for three and a half years “Coroners Inquest,” New Zealander, Volume XXI, Issue 2215, 5 September 1864.

[55] Engaged as Armourer Sergeant MSD Britomart Barracks.  ibid.

[56] Found drowned, near the Queen-street Wharf, on the 3rd July 1862, formerly of the Royal Artillery, and latterly employed in the Military Store Department. “Died,” New Zealander, Volume XVIII, Issue 1701,, 5 July 1862.

[57] “Matters Military “.

[58] Bolton, A History of the Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, 38.

[59] Terry Shattock, “Unpublished Work on New Zealand War Medals,” (2018).

[60] “Deaths,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXXII, Issue 5288, 23 September 1876.

[61] “Military Funeral,” New Zealand Herald, Volume I, Issue 254, 5 September 1864; ibid.

[62] “Matters Military “.

[63] Fernyhough, History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1920-1945, ix.

[64] “The New Military Store Staff Corps,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXII, Issue 2713, 28 March 1866.

[65] Horse Guards Adjutant-General, Dress Regulations for the Army (London: Printed under the Superintendence of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office,, 1864), 116-18.

[66] Julia Millen, Salute to Service: A History of the Royal New Zealand Corps of Transport and Its Predecessors, 1860-1996 (Wellington: Victoria University Press, 1997, 1997), Bibliographies, Non-fiction, 24-25.

[67] “The Role of the Commissariat During the Waikato Campaign, 1863 – 1864,” http://www.soldiersofempire.nz/the-role-of-the-commissariat-during-the-waikato-campaign-1863—1864.html.

[68] Davis, “The Imperial Garrison in New Zealand, 1840-1870 with Particular Reference to Auckland,” 131.

[69] “Fort Britomart,” New Zealand Spectator and Cook’s Strait Guardian, Volum XIX, Issue 1942, 12 March 1864.

[70] “Te Awamutu,” New Zealand Herald, Volume I, Issue 124, 6 April 1864

[71] “Taranaki. The Kaitake Pa Shelled, Abandonment of Tataraimaka, Withdrawal of the Troops (from Our Special Correspondent) New Plymouth June 29,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XIX, Issue 1885, 1 August 1863.

[72] “Wanganui,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXIII, Issue 3003, 11 March 1867.

[73]  The Whanganui Depot had been established by Assistant Superintendent of Stores A.C. Macduff in 1864.   “Tenders for Supply of Straw,” New Zealand Herald, Volume II, Issue 344, 19 December 1864.

[74] “Page 2 Advertisements Column 5,” New Zealand Herald, Volume IV, Issue 1079, 30 April 1867.

[75] A. H. McLintock, “British Troops in New Zealand,”  http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/en/1966/british-troops-in-new-zealand

[76] “The Troops and the Home Government,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXV, Issue 3643, 23 March 1869.

[77] “Dismantling of Fort Britomart,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXV, Issue 3616, 19 February 1869.

[78] “Projected Departure of Mr Hamley,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXVI, Issue 4007, 25 June 1870.

[79] Garry Clayton, The New Zealand Army: A History from the 1840’s to the 1990s ([Wellington, N.Z.]: New Zealand Army, 1990, 1990), Non-fiction, 26.

[80] “Militia and Volunteer Appointments,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume 2075, Issue XX, 14 March 1864 1864.

[81] Bolton, A History of the Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, 49.

[82] “Page 1 Advertisements Column 5,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXV, Issue 3596, 27 January 1869.

[83] “The Daily Southern Cross,” Daily Southern Cross, Volume XXV, Issue 3595, 26 January 1869.

[84] “Projected Departure of Mr Hamley.”

[85] Fernyhough, A Short History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps (First Edition) 16-17.

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Officers of the NZAOC 1917-1939

Established under the auspice of the 1914 Defence regulations,[1] the New Zealand Army Ordnance Department (NZAOD) and the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (NZAOC) were established as a branch under the Quartermaster-General in 1917.  Assuming responsibility for the functions of Director of Equipment and Stores and the Director of Ordnance and Artillery, the officers of the NZAOD would be organised into three functional areas;

  • The Directing Staff
  • The Executive Staff and
  • The Inspectorate Staff

The initial officers of the NZAOD were drawn from the staff of the Defence Stores, Royal New Zealand Artillery, New Zealand Staff Corps (NZSC) and New Zealand Permanent Staff (NZPS) provided a bedrock of experience in which to build upon.

In 1920 the appointment of Director of Equipment and Ordnance Stores was renamed Director of Ordnance Services (DOS) and the post of Chief Ordnance Officer (COO) created with the intent that the DOS would provide the overall management of the New Zealand Ordnance Services and the COO acting as the Commanding Officer of the NZAOC. In 1922 the DOS assumed the role of Commanding Officer of the NZAOC from the COO, with the COO taking charge of the Trentham Ordnance Depot. Major King was appointed DOS in 1924 and for the duration of his tenure would retain the appointment of COO.

1924 saw the NZAOD amalgamate into the NZAOC and the original structure dispensed with. Many of the original officers had retired, replaced by new officers with war service in Ordnance or Quartermaster roles including some with Ordnance training at Woolwich. Due to a lack of qualified personnel, the appointments of Inspecting Ordnance Officer (IOO) and Inspector of Ordnance Machinery (IOM) was carried by one officer with responsibility for the appointment split between the Director of Ordnance and the Director of Artillery.

The Defence Regulation of 1927 clarified the status of the NZAOC and details its responsibilities as follows;[2]

The Director of Ordnance Services, assisted by the Chief Ordnance Officer, the Inspecting Ordnance Officer, and the Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, is responsible to the Quartermaster-General for;

  • The provision, receipt, storage, distribution, repair, examination, and maintenance of small-arms, machineguns, vehicles, clothing and necessaries, equipment and general stores (including medical and veterinary), and camp and barrack equipment,
  • The inspection and repair of armament and warlike stores, and the inspection of gun-ammunition,
  • The provision, receipt, storage, and distribution of small arms ammunition,
  • The receipt, storage, issue, and repair of fixed armament, field armament, and artillery vehicles,
  • The organization and control of ordnance workshops,
  • The preparation and periodic revision of Equipment Regulations and barrack and hospital schedules,
  • The organization, administration, and training of the N.Z Army Ordnance Corps,
  • The maintenance of statistics of the Ordnance Department.

Despite the challenges of the depression, the NZAOC would struggle through the 1930s and by the beginning of 1939 the officers of the NZAOC were employed as follows;[3]

Branch of the Adjutant and Quarter-Master General

Director of Ordnance Services- Lieutenant Colonel T.J King.

Main Ordnance Depot

  • Chief Ordnance Officer – Lieutenant Colonel T.J King.
  • Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer, Major W.R Burge, MC, NZSC.
  • Ordnance Officer (Provision), Captain H. E. Erridge.
  • Ordnance Officer, Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC.
  • Assistant Ordnance Officer, Lieutenant A.H Andrews, BE.
  • Inspecting Ordnance Officer, Captain I. R. Withell, B.Sc., RNZA.
  • Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, Lieutenant S. B. Wallace, BE.

Northern Military District

  • District Ordnance Officer – Lieutenant D.L. Lewis.
    • Northern Command Ordnance Depot, Ngaruawahia.
  • Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS.

Central Military District

  • District Ordnance Officer – Major W.R Burge, MC, NZSC.
    • Main Ordnance Depot, Trentham.

 Southern Military District

  • District Ordnance Officer – Lieutenant D. Nicol.
    • Southern Command Ordnance Depot, Burnham.

List of NZAOC Officers 1917-1939

Head of Corps

  • Director of Equipment and Ordnance Stores, Major T. McCristell, NZAOD. 1 Apr 1917 to 30 Jan 1920. [4]
  • Director of Ordnance Services, Lieutenant Colonel H. E. Pilkington, CBE, RNZA. 30 Jan 1920 to 1 Oct 1924. [5] [6] [7]
  • Director of Ordnance Services, Lieutenant Colonel T.J King. 1 Oct 1924 – incumbent.[8] [9] [10]
  • King

Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Chief Ordnance Officer, Lieutenant Colonel T McCristell. 30 Jan 1920 to 30 Apr 1920.[11]
  • Chief Ordnance Officer, Captain T.J King. 30 Apr 1920 – incumbent 1939. [12]

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Assistant Director of Equipment and Ordnance Stores, Temporary Captain T. J. King. 1 Apr 1917 to Jan 1920.
  • Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer, Captain A.W Baldwin. 3 July 1921 to 1922.
  • Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer, Lieutenant H. E. Erridge. 31 July 1926 to 19 May 1929
  • Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer, Captain W.R Burge, MC, NZSC. 18 Apr 1929 – incumbent 1939. [13] [14]

Ordnance Accounting Officer

  • Ordnance Accounting Officer, Lieutenant J.M. Miller. 3 Jul 1918 to 12 Jul 1920.[15] [16]
  • Ordnance Accounting Officer, Lieutenant C.I. Gossage, OBE. 16 Aug 1920 to Dec 22.[17] [18] [19]
  • Ordnance Accounting Officer, Lieutenant T.W Page. 1 Jan 23 to 27 Jul 29.[20] [21]

Northern Command Ordnance Officers

  • Ordnance Officer Auckland, Captain W.T Beck, DSO. 3 Apr 17 to Mar 1918.
  • Ordnance Officer Auckland, Captain L.F McNair. 16 Jan 1918 to23 Apr 21.[22]
  • Ordnance Officer Auckland, Lieutenant M.J Lyons. 1 Mar 1920 to Sept 1920.[23] [24] [25] [26]
  • Ordnance Officer Auckland, Captain E.C Dovey, NZSC. Oct 20 to11 Jul 21.[27]
  • Ordnance Officer Northern Command, Captain A.W Baldwin. 1922 to1 Aug 26.[28]
  • Baldwin
  • Ordnance Officer Northern Command, Captain F. E. Ford. 1 Sept 1926 to 30 Jan 1931.[29] [30]
  • ford
  • Ordnance Officer Northern Command, Lieutenant J.W Barry, NZSC. 31 Jan 1931 to12 Oct 1934.[31] [32] [33] [34]
  • Ordnance Officer Northern Command, Lieutenant D.L. Lewis. 13 Oct 1934 – incumbent 1939. [35] [36] [37] [38]

Central Command Ordnance Officers

  • Central Districts Ordnance Officer, Captain F. E. Ford. 1 Apr 1917 to 1 Dec 1921.[39] [40]
  • Ordnance Officer, Central Military Command, Captain H. H. Whyte, M.C. 2 Dec 1921 to 2 April 1929.[41] [42]

Whyte

  • Ordnance Officer, Central Military Command, Lieutenant H. E. Erridge. 19 May 1929 to 20 Dec 1930.[43] [44][45]
  • Ordnance Officer, Central Military Command, Captain W.R Burge, MC, NZSC. 21 Dec 1930 – incumbent 1939. [46]

Southern Command Ordnance Officers

  • Ordnance Officer Southern Command, Captain A.R.C White. 1 Apr 1917 to 13 Dec 1930.[47] [48]
  • Ordnance Officer, Burnham, Captain O.P. McGuigan. 1921 to15 Oct 1922.[49] [50]
  • Ordnance Officer Southern Command, Lieutenant H. E. Erridge. 20 Dec 1930 to 31 Jan 1934.[51] [52] [53] [54] [55]
  • Ordnance Officer Southern Command, Lieutenant D.L Lewis. 1 Feb 1934 to 16 Apr 1934.[56]
  • Ordnance Officer Southern Command, Lieutenant D. Nicol. 19 May 1934 – incumbent 1939. [57] [58] [59] [60]

Dunedin Ordnance Officers

  • Ordnance Officer Dunedin, Captain O.P. McGuigan. 1 Apr 1917 to 1921.

Trentham Ordnance Officers

  • Ordnance Officer Trentham Camp, Honorary Lieutenant McNair, NZSC. 19 Mar 1917 to16 Jan 1918. [61]
  • Ordnance Officer Main Depot, Lieutenant H.H Whyte. 13 May 1920 to 4 Apr 1929. [62] [63]
  • Ordnance Officer Main Depot, Captain W. M. Bell. 15 Mar 1929 to15 Dec 1930. [64] [65] [66]
  • Ordnance Officer Main Depot, Lieutenant H. E. Erridge. 19 May 1929 to20 Dec 1930.[67] [68]
  • Ordnance Officer Main Depot, Captain A. W. Baldwin. 1 Aug 1926 to 31 Mar 31.
  • Ordnance Officer Main Depot, Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC. 22 Apr 31- incumbent 1939. [69]
  • Ordnance Officer Main Depot, Lieutenant D.L Lewis, 16 Apr 34 to 1 June 34.[70]
  • Ordnance Officer (Provision), Captain H. E. Erridge. 29 Jun 1934.[71] [72]
  • Officer in Charge, Ordnance Workshop, Trentham Lieutenant A.H Andrews, BE. 17 Jun 1936 to 21 Sep 1937.[102]
  • Assistant Ordnance Officer Main Depot, Lieutenant A.H Andrews, BE, 17 Jun 1938- incumbent 1939. [73]

Palmerston North Ordnance Officers

  • Ordnance Officer, Palmerston North NZAOC Detachment, Captain F. E. Ford. 3 Apr 1917 to1 Dec 21.

Featherston Camp Ordnance Officers

  • Ordnance Officer Featherston Camp, Captain A. W. Baldwin. 19 Mar 1917 to 3 July 1921.[74] [75]
  • Ordnance Officer Featherston Camp, Lieutenant L.A Clement. 4 July 1921 to 31 Nov 21. [76]
  • Ordnance Officer Featherston Camp, Captain F. E. Ford. 1 Dec 21 to 1 Sep 26. [77] [78] [79] [80]

Executive Staff Ordinance Officers

  • Executive Staff Ordinance Officer, Lieutenant Eugene Key. 16 Jan 1918 to 12 Nov 1919. [81]
  • Executive Staff Ordinance Officer, Lieutenant Albert Austin. 3 Jul 1918 to 14 Jul 1921. [82]
  • Executive Staff Ordinance Officer, lieutenant Walter N. Bates. 3 Jul 1918 to 20 Jun 1920.[83]

The Inspector of Ordnance Machinery

  • The Inspector of Ordnance Machinery, Captain B.G.V Parker. 1 Apr 1917 to 30 Sep 1919.

Inspector of Engineers, Electric Light and Defence Vessels Stores

  • Inspector of Engineers, Electric Light and Defence Vessels Stores, Captain George John Parrell. 1 Apr 1917 to 30 Sep 1919[84]
  • Inspector of Engineers, Electric Light and Defence Vessels Stores, Captain A.D Neilson. 1 Jul 1919 to 14 Jun 1921.[85] [86]

Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Acting Inspector of Ordnance Machinery

  • Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Acting Inspector of Ordnance, Machinery Captain William Ivory, RNZA. 1 Jan 1921 to 17 Jun 1925. [87] [88] [89] [90]
  • Acting Inspecting Ordnance Officer, Lieutenant A de T Nevill, RNZA. 18 Jun 1925 to 11 Jan 1927.[91] [92]
  • Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Inspector Mechanical Engineer, Captain William Ivory, RNZA. 2 Jan 1927 to 6 Apr 1933.
  • Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, Lieutenant I.R Withell, RNZA. 18 Dec 1933 to 21 Sep 37. [93] [94]

Assistant IOO and OEM

  • Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, Lieutenant I.R Withell, RNZA. 16 May 1929 to 4 Oct 1932.[95] [96] [97] [98]
  • Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, Lieutenant S. B. Wallace, BE 18 Dec 1933 to 15 Feb 1936.[99] [100] [101]

Inspecting Ordnance Officer

  • Inspecting Ordnance Officer, Captain I. R. Withell, B.Sc., RNZA. 21 Sep 1937 – incumbent 1939.[103]

Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Ordnance Mechanical Engineer (Temp), Lieutenant A.H Andrews, BE. 21 Sep 1937 to17 Jun 1938.[104] [105]
  • Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, Lieutenant S. B. Wallace, BE. 18 Jun 1938 – incumbent 1939. [106]

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Mount Eden

  • Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, A, Duvall. 10 Jan 1918 to 3 Jul 1919[107] [108]
  • Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Captain E.H Sawle.  1920 to 25 Nov 1927
  • Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Lieutenant M.J Lyons.  26 Nov 1927 to 1931 Mar 1931.
  • Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition(Temporary), Captain I. R. Withell, RNZA, 1 Apr 1931 to 31 Sept 1931.
  • Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS. 1 Sept 1931 – incumbent 1939.[109]

Inspectorial Staff Ordnance Officers

  • Lieutenant William E. Luckman. 1 Apr 1917 to 12 Sep 1920.[110]
  • Lieutenant Frederick W. Kibblewhite. N 1 Apr 1917 to 19 Oct 1920.[111]
  • Lieutenant William H Manning. 1 Apr 1917 to 4 Apr 1920.[112]
  • Lieutenant William Ramsey. 1 Apr 1917 to 4 Apr 1920.[113]

IC Ordnance Workshops Devonport

  • Armament Quartermaster Sergeant George Bush. 15 Mar 1917 to 21 Aug 1924.
  • Armament Staff Sargent Samuel Thompson. 30 Sep 1924 to incumbent 1939.

Copyright © Robert McKie 2019

Notes:

[1] “Regulations for the Military Forces of the Dominion of New  Zealand,” New Zealand Gazette No 6, 23 January 1914, Page 237 Para 62.

[2] “Regulations for the Military Forces of the Dominion of New Zealand,” New Zealand Gazette, May 19 1927.

[3] The War Office, The Monthly Army List, February 1939 (London: His Majestys Stationary Office, 1939).

[4] Relinquished position to Director of Ordnance Services on 30 January 1920. “Appointment of Director of Ordnance Services and Chief Ordnance Officer,” New Zealand Gazette No 15, 19 February 1920, 547.

[5] Assumed position from Director of Equipment and Ordnance Stores on 30 January 1920.Ibid.

[6] “Pilkington, Herbert Edward,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1896 – 1930).

[7] Appointed Quartermaster General 1 October 1924″Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 64, 6 October 1924, 6.

[8] Appointed DOS Vice Pilkington 1 October 1924  Ibid.

[9] Appointed DOS Vice Pilkington 1 October 1924  Ibid.

[10] Major J.S Bolton, A History of the Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (Trentham: RNZAOC, 1992).

[11] Assumed position 30 January 1920, relinquished it to Captain T.J King on 30 April 1920 when seconded to Audit Department. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 55, 4 June 1920, 1865.

[12] “King, Thomas Joseph,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand 1914-1946.

[13]  Appointed Assistant COO 18 April 1929 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 48, 27 June 1929, 1761.

[14] “New Zealand Army,” Evening Post, Volume CVII, Issue 150, 29 June 1929.

[15] “Whyte, Herbert Henry,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1914): 117.

[16] Relinquished appointment on retirement on 12 July 1920. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 55, 4 June 1920, 1866.

[17] Previously DADOS NZEF, after demobilisation Gossage joined the NZAOD as a Lieutenant on 16 August 1920. “Gossage, Charles Ingram  “, Personal File, Archives New Zealand 1914.

[18] Relinquished commission due to retirement 31 December 1922.”Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 2, 11 January 1923.

[19] “Personal – Gossage,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LX, Issue 18332,, 23 February 1923.

[20] Howard E. Chamberlain, Service Lives Remembered : The Meritorious Service Medal in New Zealand and Its Recipients, 1895-1994 ([Wellington, N.Z.]: H. Chamberlain, 1995), 350-51.

[21] Retired 29 July 1929 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 58, August 1930.

[22] “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “, New Zealand Gazette No 12  (1918).

[23] Appointed 1 March 1920″Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 41, April 22 1920, 1257.

[24]Ordnance Officer Auckland Mar 1920 to Sept 1920. “Lyons, Michael Joseph “, Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1914-1931).

[25] 1 April 1922 Relinquished the rank of lieutenant and appointed rank of Conductor, WO Class with the honorary rank of Lieutenant. 1  “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations And Transfers,” New Zealand Gazette No 29, 13 April 1922, 1046.

[26] “Lyons, Michael Joseph,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1914-1919).

[27] Ordnance Officer Auckland October 1920 to 11 July 1921. Passed away at his residence on 11 July 1921 “Personel Matter Dovey,” Evening Post, Volume CII, Issue 11, 13 July 1921.

[28] Relinquished appointment of Ordnance Officer, Northern Command 1 August 1926.”Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 77, 18 November 1926, 3254.

[29] Relinquished appointment of OO Northern Command 30 Jan 1931 “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 27, 9 April 1931, 969.

[30] Released 30 January 1931 “Defence Cuts,” Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 84, 10 April 1931.

[31] Seconded for Service with NZAOC as Ordnance Officer Northern Command 31 January 1931. “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “, New Zealand Gazette No 16, 5 March 1931.

[32] Appointed Officer in Charge Waikato Camp, Ngaruawahia in addition to appointment of OO Northern Command. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 73, 24 November 1931, 2154.

[33] “Personal Barry,” Auckland Star, Volume LXIII, Issue 282, 28 November 1932.

[34]  Relinquished appointment of  Ordnance Officer Northern Command 12 Oct 1934.”Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 83, 15 Nov 1934, 3611.

[35] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1934): 1.

[36] Lewis had formally been a NZAOC Soldier who was transferred to the Civil Services in 1931 and employed in the Main Ordnance Depot, appointed to a commission in the NZAOC with the rank of Lieutenant, on 1 February 1934    “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces.”

[37] “Personal Lewis,” Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21175, 28 May 1934.

[38] Appointed Ordnance Officer Northern Command 13 October 1934. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,”  3611.

[39] “Untitled – Ford,” Evening Post, Volume CII, Issue 81 1921.

[40] Captain F. E. Ford, who was in command of the Ordnance section attached to the Central Command in Palmerston North, proceeded to Featherston Military Camp on the 1st of December to take charge of the Featherston Ordnance Depot. “Untitled – Ford,” Manawatu Standard, Volume XLIII, Issue 386, 2 December 1921.

[41] “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 25, 11 April 1929.

[42] “Personal Items,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 19840, 10 January 1928.

[43] Appointed 14 May 1929.”Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,”  1761.

[44] “New Zealand Army.”

[45] Relinquished appointment of OO Main Ordnance Depot and OO Central Military Command 20 Dec 1930.”Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 16, 5 March 1931, 515.

[46] Appointed Command Ordnance Officer 18 April 1929. The War Office, The Monthly Army List, February 1939.

[47] Relinquished appointment of OO Southern Command 19 December 1930. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,”  969.

[48] Released 19 December 1930  “Defence Cuts.”

[49] “Personal – Mcguigan,” Manawatu Standard, Volume XLIII, Issue 351,, 20 March 1922.

[50] Posted to the retired list 15 October 1922 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 71, 22nSept 1922, 2667.

[51] Appointed Ordnance Officer Southern Command 31 January 1931 “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “.

[52] Appointed Officer in Charge Burnham Camp in addition to Ordnance Officer Appointment 20 December 1930. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 70, 10 November 1931.

[53],from December 20 1930  John J. Storey and J. Halket Millar, March Past : A Review of the First Fifty Years of Burnham Camp (Christchurch, N.Z. : Pegasus Press, 1973, 1974 printing, 1973), Non-fiction, 118.

[54] Ibid.

[55] Ibid.

[56]  David Llewellyn Lewis to be Lieutenant and appointed Ordnance Officer (Temp) Southern Command 1 February 1934. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces, New Zealand Gazette No 6, 8 Feb 1934, 201.

[57] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,”  1.

[58] David Nicol to be Lieutenant and appointed Assistant Ordnance Officer, Southern Command 19 May 1934.”Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 42, 7 June 1934, 1715.

[59] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,”  1.

[60]  Employed in a civil capacity at the Main Ordnance Depot, Trentham, was appointed to a commission NZAOC with the rank of Lieutenant on 9 May 1934

[61] “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “, New Zealand Gazette No 60  (1917).

[62] “Whyte, Herbert Henry.”

[63] 13 May 1920 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfers of Officers of the Nzsc, Nzaod and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 46, 12 May 1921.

[64]Appointed 15 March 1929 was also Officer in Charge Trentham Military Camp. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,”  1761.

[65] “New Zealand Army.”

[66]relinquished appointment of OO Main Depot 15 December 1930  “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,”  969.

[67] Appointed 14 May 1929.”Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,”  1761.

[68] “New Zealand Army.”

[69] Appointed Ordnance Officer Main Ordnance Depot 22 April 1931. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 40, 21 May 1931, 1549.

[70] Relinquishes appointment of Ordnance Officer (Temp) Southern Military Command for duty at the Main Ordnance Depot, Trentham 16 April 1934. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 38, 24 May 1934.

[71] Promoted to Captain 1 December 1934 “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “, New Zealand Gazette No 87, 29 November 1934.

[72] Appointed Ordnance Office (Provision) Main Ordnance Depot July 1934.”Personal Items Nicol, Erridge,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21862, 26 July 1934.

[73] Relinquished the appointment of OME(Temp) appointed Assistant Ordnance Officer Main Ordnance Depot 17 June 1938. “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “, New Zealand Gazette No 53, 14 July 1938, 1659.

[74] “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces,

[75] Relinquished appointment as OO Featherston Camp to become Assistant COO 3 July 1919. Replaced by Lt L.A Clements.

[76] Minute from DOS to General Officer In Charge Administration 5 May 1920 “Whyte, Herbert Henry,”  117.

[77] “Untitled – Ford.”

[78] Captain F. E. Ford in command of the Ordnance section attached to the Central Command in Palmerston North to proceed to Featherston Military Camp on the 1st of December to take charge of the Featherston Ordnance Depot. “Untitled – Ford.”

[79] Ibid.

[80] Relinquished appointment of Ordnance Officer Featherston Camp from 1 September 1926, appointed Ordnance Officer Northern Command. Ibid

[81] Relinquished position due to retirement on12 November 1919 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 145, 11 December 1919.

[82] Relinquished position due to retirement on 14 July 1921 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfers of Officers of the Nzsc, Nzaod and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 72, 4 August 1921, 2046.

[83] Relinquished position due to retirement on 20 June 1920. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ, NZ Army Ordnance Department and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 36, 8 April 1920, 1072.

[84]  Relinquished position due to retirement on 30 September 1919.”Captain George John Parrell,” New Zealand Gazette No 76, 30 September 1919, 2016.

[85] “Neilson,Albert Ernest,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1902-1921).

[86] Held appointment from1 July 1919 to 14 June 1921 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the NZ Staff Corps, Nzaod and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 16, 27 February 1922, 588.

[87] “Ivory, William “, Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1916-1933).

[88] To be OC Harbour Defences and OC RNZA Detachment Northern Command 17 June 1925 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 51, 9 June 1925.

[89] “New Zealand Naval Forces,” Poverty Bay Herald, Volume LI, Issue 16781, 14 July 1925.

[90] Captain Ivory was seconded to the RNZAOC as the IOO and Acting IOM on 12 January 1927   “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 11, 3 March 1927.

[91] Acting IOO from 18 June 1925″Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force.”

[92] Relinquished the appointment of Acting IOO on 11 January 1927 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force.”

[93] After completion of a course in England, appointed Inspection Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, 18 December 1933.”Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 3, 25 January 1934, 83.

[94] . From January 1934 “Personal Items Whitell,” Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21075, 29 January 1934.

[95] Appointed 16 May 1929 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,”  1761.

[96] “New Zealand Army.”

[97] Relinquished appointment of Assistant IOO and Assistant OME on proceeding to England for course 4 October 1932.”Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces.,” New Zealand Gazette No 65, 13 October 1932, 2110.

[98] To be Lieutenant and appointed Assistant IOO and Assistant OME 12 December 1933.”Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,”  83.

[99] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,”  2338.

[100]Appointed and granted the rank of Lieutenant in the NZAOC dated 12th December 1933  “South Canterbury Wallace,” Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21171, 23 May 1934.

[101] Relinquished the appointment of Assistant IOO and OEM to attend course in England 15 February 1936. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfers of Officers of the NZ Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 19 5 May 1936.

[102] Alan Huia Andrews, BE to be Lieutenant, 17 June 1936. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfers of Officers of the NZ Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 44, 5 May 1936.

[103] Relinquished the appointment of OME and retains the appointment of IOO 21 Sept 1937. “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “, New Zealand Gazette No 70, 14 October 1937, 2338.

[104] Appointed OME (Temp) 21 September 1937. Ibid.

[105] Relinquished the appointment of OME(Temp) appointed Assistant Ordnance Officer Main Ordnance Depot 17 June 1938. “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “,  1659.

[106] Having completed a course of instruction at the Military School of Science, Woolwich, appointed OME 18 June 1938. Ibid.

[107] “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “.

[108] “Death of an Officer,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LVI, Issue 17205, 5 July 1919.

[109] Appointed 1 Sept 1931 NZ General Order 353/1931

[110] 13 September 1920, Relinquished position on retirement. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 83, 16 September 1920.

[111] 19 October 1920, Relinquished position on retirement. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 95, 25 November 1920.

[112] Relinquished position due to retirement on 4 April 1920. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ, NZ Army Ordnance Department and Territorial Force,”  1071.

[113] Relinquished position due to retirement on 4 April 1920. Ibid.


NZAOC July 1933 to June 1934

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC between June 1933 and May 1934 was;[1]

  • 5 Officers
  • 21 Permanent Other Ranks

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer Trentham Camp

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Main Ordnance Depot

  • Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC.
  • Lieutenant D.L Lewis, NZAOC. [2]

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant J. W. Barry, N.Z. Staff Corps.[3]
  • Lieutenant L. Lewis, NZAOC.[4] [5] [6]

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge NZAOC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge NZAOC.[7]
  • Lieutenant D.L Lewis, NZAOC.[8]
  • Lieutenant D. Nicol, NZAOC.[9] [10] [11]

Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant I. R. Withell, RNZA.[12] [13]

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer Ordnance and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS.

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1934

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1934

Warrant Officer Armourers

Two armourers who had completed their time with the Royal Army Ordnance Corps had been engaged for service with the NZAOC, they were;[17]

  • Armourer Staff Sergeant-Major E. J. Hay, and
  • Armourer Quarter-master-Sergeant E. J. Trappitt

Annual Inspection of Small Arms

During this period the NZAOC continued to conduct annual inspections rifles, machine guns, and other arms of the Defence Department. Conducted by an artificer from the ordnance branch. All parts of the weapons were examined to find any faults that may have developed since the last inspection. Each inspection took about two months with some 9OOO weapon inspected in each inspection.[18] [19]

Waipukurau 1934a

Armament Staff Sergeant John William(Bill) Dalton and Armament Staff Sergeant Arthur Stewart Richardson, Artillery camp, Waipukurau March 1934. Photo courtesy Norm Lamont

 

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes:

[1] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1934).

[2] Relinquishes appointment of Ordnance Officer (Temp) Southern Military Command for duty at the Main Ordnance Depot, Trentham 16 April 1934. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 38, 24 May 1934.

[3] “Personal Barry,” Auckland Star, Volume LXIII, Issue 282, 28 November 1932.

[4] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,”  1.

[5] Lewis had formally been a NZAOC Soldier who was transferred to the Civil Services in 1931 and employed in the Main Ordnance Depot, appointed to a commission in the NZAOC with the rank of Lieutenant, on 1 February 1934    “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 83, 15 Nov 1934.

[6] “Personal Lewis,” Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21175, 28 May 1934.

[7] John J. Storey and J. Halket Millar, March Past : A Review of the First Fifty Years of Burnham Camp (Christchurch, N.Z. : Pegasus Press, 1973, 1974 printing, 1973), Non-fiction, 118.

[8]  David Llewellyn Lewis to be Lieutenant and appointed Ordnance Officer (Temp) Southern Command 1 February 1934. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces, New Zealand Gazette No 6, 8 Feb 1934, 201.

[9] David Nicol to be Lieutenant and appointed Assistant Ordnance Officer, Southern Command 19 May 1934.”Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 42, 7 June 1934, 1715.

[10] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,”  1.

[11]  Employed in a civil capacity at the Main Ordnance Depot, Trentham, was appointed to a commission NZAOC with the rank of Lieutenant on 9 May 1934

[12] After completion of a course in England, appointed Inspection Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, 18 December 1933.”Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 3, 25 January 1934, 83.

[13] . From January 1934 “Personal Items Whitell,” Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21075, 29 January 1934.

[14] To be Lieutenant and appointed Assistant IOO and Assistant OME 12 December 1933.”Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,”  83.

[15] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,”  1.

[16]Appointed and granted the rank of Lieutenant in the NZAOC dated 12th December 1933  “South Canterbury Wallace,” Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21171, 23 May 1934.

[17] “Defence Armourers,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21788, 1 May 1934.

[18] “Annual Inspetions,” Press, Volume LXX, Issue 21097, 23 February 1934.

[19] “Inspection of Arms,” Volume LXX, Issue 21097, 23 February 1934.


NZAOC June 1932 to May 1933

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC between June 1932 and May 1933was; [1]

    • 2 Officers
    • 18 Permanent Other Ranks

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Main Ordnance Depot

  • Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC.
  • Captain H. E. Erridge NZAOC.[2]

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant J. W. Barry, N.Z. Staff Corps

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W.R Burge, MC, NZSC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge NZAOC

Inspecting Officer Ordnance and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Major W Ivory, RNZA

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant I. R. Withell, RNZA

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS.

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1933

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1933

Improvised Explosive Device incident

The Inspecting Ordnance Officer Major W. Ivory, conducted a scene examination and provided evidence in court in relation to a IED incident that occurred at Marton on 2 June 1932.[3]

Retirements

Major W. Ivory. RNZA. Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer retired on 6 April 1933. Major Ivory was responsible for the design, erection, and organisation of the new military workshops at Trentham, and for the scheme for the demolition of the Mount Cook Barracks. As the Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, Ivory had organised the whole of the military workshops throughout New Zealand for the repair and maintenance of equipment.[4] [5]

Overseas Courses

Captain’ I. R. Withell, RNZA proceeded to England for courses of instruction in Ordnance duties.[6] [7]

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes:

[1] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1932 to May 1933,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1933).

[2]  Promoted 1 December 1934 “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 87, 29 November 1935.

[3] “Bus Blown Up,” Press, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20584, 28 June 1932, 28 June 1932.

[4] “Officers Low Pay,” Auckland Star, Volume LXIV, Issue 9, 12 January 1933.

[5] “New Zealand Army,” Evening Post, Volume CXV, Issue 8, 11 January 1933.

[6] Relinquished the appointments of Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer 4 October 1932 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces.,” New Zealand Gazette No 65, 13 October 1932, 2110.

[7] “Defence Services,” Evening Post, Volume CXIV, Issue 91, 14 October 1932.


NZAOC July 1919 to June 1920

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOD/NZAOC on 30 June 1920 was 3391, consisting of;

  • Officers, 14;
  • Other ranks, 377

Despite pressure to reduce manning levels, it had not been possible to reduce the NZAOD/NZAOC to a greater extent owing to the large amount of work still required to be carried out in connection with the war. In addition to the ordinary ordnance work in connection with the Territorial Force, the NZAOD/NZAOC was required to;[1]

  • maintain extra personnel for the handling, storage and accounting of hospital equipment for the hospitals under the Defence Department,
  • maintain extra personnel for the educational and vocational establishments,
  • Handle the large quantity of military equipment arriving from overseas.

Until the hospitals were transferred to civil control, and the Vocational Training Branch took over by the Repatriation Department, and the military equipment for the Military Force distributed in accordance with future requirements, NZAOD/NZAOC personnel reductions were unable to be reduced to any great extent without serious risk of incurring inefficiency and loss of stores.[2]

Key Appointments

Directing and Executive Staff

Director of Equipment and Ordnance Stores

  • Major T McCristell, NZAOD.[3]

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Lieutenant Colonel H. E. Pilkington, CBE, RNZA.[4]

Chief Ordnance Officer, Dominion of New Zealand

  • Lieutenant Colonel T McCristell, NZAOD.[5] 30 January – 30 April 1920
  • Captain T.J King, NZAOD

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant A.W Baldwin, NZAOD. [6]

Ordnance Accounting Officer

  • lieutenant James M. Miller, NZAOD.[7]

Northern Military District Ordnance Officer

  • Captain F. E. Ford, NZAOD.
  • Lieutenant M.J Lyons. [8]

Canterbury and Nelson Military District Ordnance Officer

  • Captain A.R.C White, NZAOD

Otago and Southland Military Districts Ordnance Officer

  • Captain O.P McGuigan, NZAOD

Ordnance Officer Trentham Camp

  • Lieutenant H.H Whyte, NZAOD.[9] [10]

Ordnance Officer – Featherston Camp

  • Lieutenant A.W Baldwin, NZAOD.[11]
  • Lieutenant L.A Clement.[12]

Executive Staff Ordnance Officers

  • Lieutenant Eugene Key, NZAOD.[13]
  • Lieutenant Albert Austin, NZAOD.
  • lieutenant Walter N. Bates, NZAOD. [14]

Inspectorial Staff

Inspector of Ordnance Machinery

  • Captain B.G.V Parker, NZAOD.[15]

Inspector of Engineers, Electric Light and Defence Vessels Stores

  • Captain George John Parrell, NZAOD. [16]
  • Captain A.D Neilson.[17]

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Captain A, Duvall, NZAOD. [18]

Chief Armourer

  • Honorary Lieutenant William E. Luckman, NZAOD

Inspectorial Staff Ordnance Officers

  • Honorary Lieutenant Frederick W. Kibblewhite, NZAOD
  • Honorary Lieutenant William H Manning, NZAOD.[19]
  • Honorary Lieutenant William Ramsey, NZAOD.[20]
NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1920

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1920

Organisation Changes

This period would see the NZAOC undergo a change of command and re-designation of appointments to bringing it into line with the current RAOC naming conventions. The Director of Equipment and Ordnance Stores (DEOS) would be renamed and Director of Ordnance Services (DOS) and the position of Chief Ordnance Officer (COO) created.[21] The Division of duties between the DOS and COO was that the DOS would have executive command of the NZAOD/NZAOD with the COO would be the Commanding Officer of the NZAOC and would manage the day the day Administrative functions.[22] [23]

Major T McCristell who had held the position of DEOS since 1916,[24] would become the COO and the position of DOS filled by Lieutenant Colonel H. E. Pilkington, RNZA. Lt Col Pilkington had spent the war filling a variety of Ordnance Positions in the NZEF and Brutish Army including time as the ADOS of 19 Corps and ADOS of the NZEF. McCristell’s tenure as COO would be brief as he would be seconded to the Audi Department, relinquishing the position of COO to Captain T.J King in April 1920.[25] [26]

Produce

The revenue generated by the NZAOC for the year ending 31st May 1920, was £49,013 17s, 4d., while approximately £90,000 was saved by the renovation of part-worn uniforms.

Review of the NZAOC Establishment

It was announced on the 4th of July 1920 that a board of officers was to assemble at General Headquarters for the purpose of inquiring into the establishment of the NZAOC, with a view to its reduction and the practicability of the substitution of a percentage of civilian staff or permanent staff. The board will be composed as follows:[27]

  • President
    • Lieutenant-Colonel H. E. Pilkington, CBE. (Director of Ordnance Services);
  • Members
    • Lieutenant Colonel C. E. Andrews, OBE
    • Lieutenant Colonel H. E. Avery, G.M.G, DSO

The war revealed the requirement for maintaining an adequate supply of war material to ensure the equipping the Territorial Army on mobilisation. The deficiency of war material in the Dominion in 1914 necessitated the original Expeditionary Force being sent overseas incompletely equipped, while the shortage of military stores in New Zealand during the war became a serious handicap to the training of both the Territorial Force and the drafts for the Expeditionary Force.

The military equipment which was used by the NZEF abroad had been handed back to the Imperial authorities, and a supply of new or serviceable equipment to reequip the New Zealand Army issued in lieu, and gradually shipped to New Zealand as shipping became available. The need for storage accommodation for this equipment was very great, and although temporary arrangements were made to store it in wooden hutments at Trentham and Featherston Camps, these buildings were not suitable for storage of valuable equipment, nor were they conveniently situated for mobilization. Recommendations were made for district mobilization stores to be constructed, in order that this valuable equipment may not deteriorate and that each district may be self-contained.[28]

Fiji Expeditionary Force

Early in 1920 New Zealand dispatched Force of Fifty-Six regular soldiers to Fiji on the NZ Government Steamer Tutanekai. This Small force was sent at the request of the Governor of Fiji to provided support to the limited Police resources at his disposal to manage a strike among Indian indentured labourers and sugar cane farmers. The first peacetime deployment of New Zealand Forces, it was mainly made up of members of the RNZA and served in Fiji between 3 February -28 April 1920 and was known as the Fiji Expeditionary Force. [29]

Included as part of Fiji Expeditionary Force was a small NZAOC Detachment, which included the following personnel;

  • Staff Sergeant Joseph Warren.[30]

Annual Christmas Leave

A definite arrangement was made by the Defence Department regarding the annual leave of members of the NZAOC. Annual leave would be taken by the NZAOC as follows;[31]

  • The first party would take leave on December 4 and return to duty on December 28.
  • The second party would go on leave on December 3O and return to duty on January 22.

 Obituary

On 3 July 1919 Captain A. Duvall, of the NZAOC was found dead in the laboratory room at the Colonial Ammunition Company, the cause being a bullet wound. He was the Proof officer for the Defence Department at Auckland, it being his duty to test ammunition. He was aged fifty and left a widow, but no children. The coroner returned a verdict that death was the result of gunshot wound apparently self-inflicted while in a state of nervous depression.

Lance Corporal Duncan Macgregor of the NZAOC passed away at the comparatively early age of 54 years at Wellington on 25 July 1919. A well-known figure in local military circles, LCpl Macgregor had been a member of the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders, gaining decorations for conspicuous bravery in India and South Africa.[32]

duncan macgregor

Lance Corporal Duncan MacGregor, NZAOC. National Library of New Zealand

Provisional Dress Regulations

Provisional dress regulations for the New Zealand Permanent Forces were issued in early 1920.  The revised regulations detailed that the Director of Ordnance would wear the following dress distinctions; [33]

  • Blue Gorget patches (tabs), and
  • blue cap-bands

Discipline

Courts Martial

529 Private Samuel McShane, of the NZAOC was tried by District Court-martial on 23 September 1919 at Trentham Camp on charges of receiving public goods knowing them to have been stolen and was sentenced to 90 days’ imprisonment. His sentence remitted, Pte McShane was immediately demobilised with no demobilisation pay or privileges.[34]

Serious Charges

Serious charges were laid against 605 Conductor Walter Edward Cook, NZAOC (Temporary) of the Featherston Ordnance Detachment at the Magistrate’s Court on 18 June 1921. In outlining the case and explaining the charge; the theft of £2 11s 9d (approx. 2018 NZ$290), the property of the Government, Detective-Sergeant Lewis said that it had been a part of the accused’s duty to audit certain, accounts regarding the sale of blankets. It was alleged that Cook had altered a number of dockets, pocketed a part of the money, and then forwarded the altered dockets. The total sum involved was about £177 (approx. 2018 NZ$17000).[35]  Cook was later found guilty, reverted in rank to Private and demobilised with no demobilisation pay or privileges and sentenced to six months hard labour.[36]

Personnel Movements -July 1919 to June 1920

Transfers

  • Captain (Temp) Michael Joseph Lyons, from the regiment of Royal New Zealand Artillery with the rank of Lieutenant, 1 March 1920.

Enlistments

  • 197 Artificer Frederick Vaugha Evans
  • 644 Private Thomas William Henry Rowe
  • 663 Artificer Fredrick John Sygrove
  • 666 Lance Corporal Peter Gow Scrimgeour
  • 750 Private Peter McIlroy
  • 795 Private George Troope Dawson
  • 820 Private James Clements
  • 822 Private John James Thomas
  • 831 Private Thomas Heaton
  • 832 Private Richard Teehan
  • 835 Private William Joseph Conroy
  • 838 Private William Robert McMinn
  • 857 Private Isaac Bernard Shields
  • 860 Private Hugh Lawton Owen
  • 867 Private John Rescorl
  • 885 Private C J J Storie
  • 902 Private William Stewart Barr
  • 914 Private John Boyce
  • 920 Private Gordon James Francis Arenas
  • 938 Sergeant John Goutenoire O’Brien
  • 939 Private Harold Gordon Hill
  • 1036 Private Shepherd Hughes

Releases

  • 47 Private Charles Harbage
  • 69 Lieutenant Eugene Key
  • 86 Lance Corporal Duncan Campbell MacGregor
  • 100 Lieutenant William Ramsay
  • 103 Private Thomas Riordan
  • 105 Private Thomas Rodgers
  • 125 Private Robert Walker
  • 128 Private Ludvig Martin Williamson
  • 136 Private Clifford Seddon
  • 160 Staff Sergeant Frederick William Tavendale
  • 183 Sergeant Robert Walter Baker Gale
  • 200 Private Alfred Healy de Vere
  • 221 cadet Harry William Miller
  • 228 sergeant Thomas Graham Niven
  • 241 Corporal Theodore Norris
  • 254 Private James Gorman
  • 269 Private George Kermode
  • 273 Private Thomas Ellwood Lyle
  • 294 Corporal Richard Brady Simpson
  • 299 Lance Corporal Peter Tulloch
  • 318 Private Frank Joseph Shacklock
  • 329 Private Harold Fraser White
  • 366 Private William Henry Murdoch
  • 368 Private James King
  • 393 Private John Naylor
  • 407 Private James Crone.[37]
  • 418 Private William Henry McCarthy
  • 424 Private Phillip Thomas Labatt
  • 436 Private John Raymond Johnson
  • 441 Private Montagu Spotswood
  • 446 Private Cecil Balcombe Langridge
  • 453 Private Harold Rigby
  • 462 Private William Ernest George
  • 478 Private Andrew Robert Murphy
  • 480 Private James Herbert Turner
  • 515 Private Thomas Edward Mills
  • 518 Private James McEntee
  • 529 Private Samuel McShane
  • 574 Artificer Henry James Day
  • 601 Private James Pritchard
  • 605 Private Walter Edward Cook
  • 617 Private Horace James Richards
  • 634 Private John Morrison
  • 675 Private Benjamin Smith
  • 680 Private Egbert Edwin White
  • 690 Private John Miller
  • 697 Private William Gibbons
  • 718 Private Peter Douglas Adamson
  • 477 Corporal Lawritz Christopher Jansen
  • 493 Corporal William Parry Mortimore
  • 644 Corporal Thomas William Henry Rowe
  • 354 Sergeant William Varian Wilson
  • 431 Sergeant John McVean Walker
  • 795 Sergeant George Troope Dawson
  • Lieutenant Walter Norman Bates.
  • Lieutenant William Manning.
  • Lieutenant William Ramsay.
  • Captain George John Parrell.
  • Lieutenant Colonel T McCristell.[38]

Deaths

  • Lance Corporal Duncan Macgregor.
  • Captain A. Duvall.

Copyright © Robert McKie 2019

Notes:

[1] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1920).

[2] Ibid.

[3] Relinquished position to Director of Ordnance Services on 30 January 1920. “Appointment of Director of Ordnance Services and Chief Ordnance Officer,” New Zealand Gazette No 15, 19 February 1920, 547.

[4] Assumed position from Director of Equipment and Ordnance Stores on 30 January 1920.Ibid.

[5] Assumed position 30 January 1920, relinquished it to Captain T.J King on 30 April 1920 when seconded to Audit Department. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette no 55, 4 June 1920, 1865.

[6] “Whyte, Herbert Henry,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1914): 116.

[7] Ibid., 117.

[8] Appointed 1 March 1920″Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 41, April 22 1920, 1257.

[9] “Whyte, Herbert Henry.”

[10] 13 May 1920 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfers of Officers of the Nzsc, Nzaod and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 46, 12 May 1921.

[11] Relinquished appointment as OO Featherston Camp to become Assistant COO 3 July 1919. Replaced by Lt L.A Clements.

[12] “Whyte, Herbert Henry,”  117.

[13] Relinquished position due to retirement on12 November 1919 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 145, 11 December 1919.

[14] Relinquished position due to retirement on 20 June 1920. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ, NZ Army Ordnance Department and Territorial Force,” new Zealand Gazette No 36, 8 April 1920, 1072.

[15] Relinquished position due to retirement on 30 September 1919. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff Corps, Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery and Territorial Force.”

[16]  Relinquished position due to retirement on 30 September 1919.”Captain George John Parrell,” New Zealand Gazette No 76, 30 September 1919, 2016.

[17] “Neilson, Albert Ernest,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1902-1921).

[18] “Death of an Officer,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LVI, Issue 17205, 5 July 1919.

[19] Relinquished position due to retirement on 4 April 1920. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ, NZ Army Ordnance Department and Territorial Force,”  1071.

[20] Relinquished position due to retirement on 4 April 1920. Ibid.

[21] “Appointment of Director of Ordnance Services and Chief Ordnance Officer.”

[22] Minute from DOS to GO IC Administration Date 5 June 1920″King, Thomas Joseph,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand 1914-1946.

[23] “Ordnance Services,” New Zealand Times, Volume XLVI, Issue 10514,, 16 February 1920.

[24] “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 47, 20 April 1916.

[25] “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff and Territorial Force.”

[26] “King, Thomas Joseph.”

[27] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces.”

[28] Ibid.

[29] I. C. McGibbon and Paul William Goldstone, The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Military History (Auckland; Melbourne; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000, 2000), Bibliographies, Non-fiction, 170-71.

[30] “Warren, Joesph,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1915-1931).

[31] “Local and General – Nzaoc Annual Leave,” Dominion, Volume 13, Issue 126, 21 February 1920.

[32] “All Sorts of People,” Free Lance, Volume XIX, Issue 996, 6 August 1919.

[33] “Provisional Dress Regulations,” Southland Times, Issue 18756, 3 March 1920.

[34] “Court Martial,” New Zealand Times, Volume XLIV, Issue 10397, 30 September 1919.

[35] “Serious Charges,” Evening Post, Volume XCIX, Issue 144, 18 June 1920.

[36] “Cook, Walter Edward,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1918-1920).

[37] “Untitled -Crone,” Manawatu Standard, Volume XLIII, Issue 1784, 9 April 1920.

[38] “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Staff and Territorial Force,” New Zealand Gazette No 99, 9 December 1920.


The New Zealand Ordnance Puggaree

From 1914 to 1958 the sight of New Zealand Soldiers in felt slouch hats was commonplace. In addition to providing a practical form of headdress,  by the use of a coloured headband, it became easy to identify the Regiment or Corps of the wearer.

This article will provide a brief background on the use and history of Puggarees in New Zealand service with a focus on their use by the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps.

 

rnzaoc puggaree

RNZAOC Puggaree. Robert McKie Collection

Origins

The Puggaree origins lay in the Hindu word, ‘Pagri’ which is used to describe a wide range of traditional headdress worn by men and women throughout the Indian Sub-Continent, one of the most recognisable been the Dustaar or Sikh turban.

Soldiers by their nature are creatures of innovation and British troops serving India soon found that by wrapping a thin scarf of muslin around their headdress, not only could additional protection from sword blows be provided, but the thin cloth scarf could also be unravelled to provide insulation from the heat of the sun. Like many Indian words “Pagri” became anglicised into Puggaree.

By the 1870s the functional use of the puggaree had become secondary and the puggaree evolved into a decorative item on British Army headdress, which when used with a combination of colours could be used to distinguish regiments and corps. First used by New Zealanders in the South African war, the use of puggaree on slouch hats was formalised in the New Zealand Army 1912 Dress Regulations. These regulations detailed the colours of the distinctive puggaree used to indicate different branches of the service; [1] [2]

 

 

 

 

World War One

When first New Zealand Troops went overseas in 1914, the NZ Slouch hat was one that had been first used in the South Africa War and had a crease running down the crown from front to rear. From 1914 the Wellington Battalion wore their hats with the crown peaked and after a short period where cork helmets were also worn, General Godley issued a directive that all troops, other than the Mounted Rifles would wear the slouch hat with the crown peaked, in what became known as the “Lemon Squeezer”.[3]

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NZMR

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New Zealand felt “lemon Squeezer” hat with Ordnance Puggaree and NZEF Ordnance Badge. Robert McKie Collection

 

Worn with both the Mounted Rifles Slouch hat and the Lemon Squeezer, the puggaree became a distinctive mark of the New Zealand soldier, identifying them as distinct from soldiers from other parts of the Empire who in general used only plain puggaree on their headdress.[4]  [5] From 1917 the New Zealand puggaree also proved useful in distinguishing New Zealand troops from the Americans who wore headdress similar to the New Zealand Lemon Squeezer hat.[6]

As the war progressed, additional units that did not exist in the pre-war New Zealand Army were created, both as part of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) and as part of the Home Service forces in New Zealand. This would include the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (NZAOC) which was formed as a unit of the NZEF in early 1916 and as part of the New Zealand Permanent Forces in 1917.[7]

It is assumed that as a new unit a distinctive puggaree was adopted for the NZAOC, but the limited photographs of NZAOC personnel are black and white, making identification of colours difficult. The following photo of NZ Army Service Corps staff at Zeitoun Camp in Egypt taken in either later 1915 or early 1916, shows a soldier wearing a Lemon Squeezer hat with a coloured Puggaree with a British Army Ordnance Corps (AOC) Badge, possibly the first example of an NZ Ordnance Puggaree.

British Army Ordnance Corps 1915_zpsaibxjzox

New Zealand Supply Depot Staff at Zeitoun Camp, 1915. Note Ordnance solder front row 3rd from left. National Army Museum of New Zealand

British Army Ordnance Corps_zpshkmjkhxu

Ordnance Soldier with Lemon Squeezer, Puggaree and AOC Badge, New Zealand Supply Depot Staff at Zeitoun Camp, 1915. National Army Museum of New Zealand

A later photograph of the NZAOC at taken at Buckle Street in 1918 the Puggaree are distinctive.

Ordnance 1918

The New Zealand Ordnance Corps 1918, Buckle Street Wellington. RNZAOC School

1918

Taken from the 1918 Buckle Street picture this blown up image shows two soldiers, on with a Lemon Squeezer Hat the other with a Mounted Rifles slouch hat, both puggarees could be of the NZ Ordnance pattern.

In a 1919 Photo of the NZAOC staff taken in Germany, the Puggaree of the Ordnance Staff are less distinctive and look to be a single colour, possibly red or Blue.

NZ Ordnance Staff 1919

New Zealand Ordnance Corps demobilisation Staff at Mulheim, Germany, Febuary1919. Alexander Turnbull Library/Public Domain

t falvey

Ordnance Corporal (Possibly TY Falvey) London 1918

A Newspaper article from December 1918 does provide evidence that an Ordnance puggaree of red/blue/red existed. The article published in the Press on 5 December 1918 states the following;[8]There are only two units in the New Zealand Division with red in the puggaree. They are the Artillery and Ordnance, and in both units, the colours are red and blue”. Although slightly incorrect in that only two units of the NZEF wore red in the puggaree, The Infantry also has red in their Puggaree, this sentence does identify that the Ordnance Puggaree was red and blue.

The Inter-War Years

The red/blue/red Puggaree would formally be adopted as the Puggaree of the NZAOC in 1923 when the New Zealand Army updated its Dress Regulations for the first time since 1912.[9]

Ordnance Puggaree would have been a common sight around New Zealand Military establishments up to 1931, where with the virtual disestablished of the NZAOC their use would have shrunk to twenty or so remaining NZAOC Soldiers.

World War Two

The onset of war in 1939 would see an explosive growth of the New Zealand Army from a few hundred personnel to thousands, with articles published in newspapers to educate the public on the different coloured puggaree and which units they belonged to.[10] The red/blue/red Ordnance puggaree would be worn throughout the war years by the NZAOC and the New Zealand Ordnance Corps, the Ordnance component of the NZEF and the Territorial Army.[11]

ww2

Lemon Squeezer as worn by members of the 2nd NZEF NZOC, Middle East, Italy 1939-44.

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Ordnance soldier of the NZOC, New Zealand 1942-44.

Post War

The Lemon Squeezer Hat and puggaree would remain a fixture of the New Zealand Army until 1958 when the Lemon Squeezer was withdrawn from services and replaced with a new Battle Dress cap and the use of puggaree within the Ordnance Corps would fade away from memory.

tf 3rd intake waikato camp 1951

RNZAOC Territorial Force 3rd intake Ngaruawahia Camp 1951. RNZAOC School Collection

camp commandants bodyguard 1954

RNZAOC Camp Commandants Bodyguard, Trentham Camp 1954. RNZAOC School Collection

Copyright © Robert McKie 2019

Notes:

[1] The original MZ Slouch hat had been first used in the South Africa War and had a crease running from front to rear. From 1914 the Wellington Battalion wore their hats peaked

[2] Malcolm Thomas and Cliff Lord, New Zealand Army Distinguishing Patches, 1911-1991 (Wellington, N.Z.: M. Thomas and C. Lord, 1995, 1995), Bibliographies, Non-fiction, Part One, 128-29

[3] D. A. Corbett, The Regimental Badges of New Zealand: An Illustrated History of the Badges and Insignia Worn by the New Zealand Army (Auckland, N.Z. : Ray Richards, 1980

Revised end. edition, 1980), Non-fiction, 47-48.

[4] Australian and Canada would both use coloured puggaree on their respective headdress, just not to the same extent as New Zealand.

[5] “Local and General,” Dominion, Volume 9, Issue 2610,, 4 November 1915.

[6] “Visit to Paris,” North Otago Times, Volume CV, Issue 14001, 11 December 1917.

[7] “New Zealand Army Ordnance Department and New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps Regulations,” New Zealand Gazette, No 95, June 7 1917.

[8] “Soldiers and Dress – Ordnance Pugaree,” Press, Volume LIV, Issue 16387, 5 December 1918.

[9] Thomas and Lord, New Zealand Army Distinguishing Patches, 1911-1991, 35.

[10] “New Zealand Troops Wear Turbans,” Evening Star, Issue 23432  (1939).

[11] The NZOC was formed as a unit of the NZED in 1939 and a unit of the Territorial Army in 1941.


New Zealand Base Ordnance Depot, Egypt and Italy 1940-46

The 2nd NZEF Base Ordnance Depot(BOD) was the primary Ordnance organisation supporting the 2nd NZEF in its operations from Egypt to Italy from 1940 to 1946. Unlike the Infantry, Artillery, Engineers and even the Army Servicer Corps, New Zealand did not have an Ordnance component in the Territorial Army from which to draw upon when establishing the Ordnance services of the 2nd NZEF, this led to the NZ BOD having to be built from scratch. The two senior ordnance officers, King and Andrews were from the regular Army, some of the personnel were drawn from the civilian staff of the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (NZAOC) with others having a clerical or warehousing background. With this diversity of experience, the men of the NZ BOD with the assistance of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps (RAOC) Depots in Egypt underwent a crash course in the intricacies of British military stores accounting, warehousing and distribution operations. Initially based at Maadi Camp on the outskirts of Cairo in Egypt, the NZ BOD would eventually grow into two Depots, one in Egypt and one in Italy. Not entirely a Base organisation the NZ BOD would also deploy an Advanced Ordnance Depot and conduct stores convoy operations. This article provides an introduction to the NZ BOD, another forgotten New Zealand Ordnance unit of the Secoend World War.

When given command of the NZDF, General Freyberg as the General Officer Commanding had been given a mandate and authority to “establish such administrative headquarters and base and line of communication units as are necessary for the functions of command, organisation, including training, and administration with which he has been invested”, with “the authority to procure equipment (shown on equipment tables) that cannot be supplied through official channels. Such equipment to be bought through Ordnance channels where possible”,[1]  this included the establishment of a Base Ordnance Depot to support the growing New Zealand Force

As the New Zealand Forces arrived in Egypt, the logistical situation was dire. The Middle East Command was in a period of transition from a peacetime to a wartime footing. The German victory’s in the low countries and France which saw the loss of much of the British Armies equipment in the subsequent evacuation resulting in the Middle East placed on a low priority for personnel and resources as the United Kingdom rearmed and prepared for invasion. The RAOC resources which the NZEF could draw upon were limited and consisted of;[2] [3]

  • A combined Ordnance Depot and Workshop at Abbassia
  • A Clothing and mobilisation sub-depot at Kasr-el-Nil
  • A sub-depot at Alexandra
  • Forward dumps of tentage, accommodation stores and ammunition at El Daba and Mersa Matruh.

The first Director of Ordnance Services (DOS) for the Middle East would not be appointed until late 1940 when Colonel W.W Richards was transferred from France to Egypt as a Brigadier.[4] Cognisant of the supply situation and also the international composition of the Middle East Command, Brigadier Richards would  oversee the rapid upgrade of infrastructure, personnel and capability of the combined Ordnance services of the United Kingdom, Australia, South Africa ,India and New Zealand, creating effective Ordnance Field Force units supported by robust base facilities, shaped to meet the national requirements of each contributing nation.

Known as the New Zealand Ordnance Corps (NZOC), The embryotic New Zealand Ordnance organisation that arrived in Egypt with the 1st Echelon included;[5]

  • Lieutenant Colonel T.J. King NZAOC, DADOS
  • Captain A.H Andrews NZAOC, Ordnance Mechanical Engineer,
  • Lieutenant D.E Harper NZOC. OO Base Depot
  • Lieutenant G Langslow NZOC, 9 LAD, 4 Field Regiment NZA
  • Lieutenant G.D Pollock NZOC, 10 LAD, 5 Field Park Company, NZE
  • Captain J.H Mander NZOC, 11 LAD, HQ 4 Infantry Brigade,
  • Captain N.P Manning NZOC, 12 LAD, 27 Machine Gun Battalion,
  • Lieutenant J.O Kelsey NZOC, 13 LAD, Divisional Cavalry Regiment,
  • J.H England NZOC, 14 LAD, Divisional Signal Units
  • NZOC tradesmen, Clerks, Storemen and Drivers held under the Base Depot organisation.

The initial Base Depot found in the embarkation rolls was not the Base Ordnance Depot but a convenient use of the War Establishment to place personnel who were not allocated to existing units on the establishment. On mobilisation Army headquarters was sure that a base function would be required, and Base Depot was the only suitable unit that could be found on British War Establishments that could be used for the personnel filling many if the anticipated base roles in the NZEF. Under General Freyberg’s mandate to “establish such administrative headquarters and base and line of communication units” The Base Depot was disestablished in April 1940 and Headquarters NZEF Base formally established as a unit of the NZEF with personnel distributed to functional subunits, including NZOC Stores and clerical staff to the NZ BOD.[6] At this stage, NZ BOD would also manage some of the Base Workshop functions in conjunction with 31 LAD (Base)

Maadi Camp 1941

View of the working area of the Ordnance Depot at Maadi Camp in 1941. Photo H.J Gilbertson

Maadi Camp 1941.1

View of the working area of the Ordnance Depot at Maadi Camp in 1941. Photo H.J Gilbertson

The 2nd NZEF had arrived in Egypt with the bare minimum of equipment, but by August 1940 the NZ BOD was in the routine of receiving and issuing new equipment to the force; and in fact, the equipping of New Zealand Forces was proceeding far better than with comparable United Kingdom units in the area. As the accounting system was still in a peacetime system the British authorities were most generous in providing what equipment was available to the Commonwealth. At this time issues of equipment had to be checked and signed for, with the arrangement with the United Kingdom that the initial issues to the New Zealand Forces would be paid for at the actual value.

The 2nd NZEF had arrived in Egypt with the same uniforms and web equipment as the NZEF of 1918. As stocks became available the NZ BOD began to issue the new 1937 pattern ‘Battledress’ and ’37 pattern webbing’ to all New Zealand Troops. Additionally, as each draft arrived issues of theatre specific clothing and equipment had to be issued to each soldier;

  • Helmets steel 1,
  • Respirators Anti Gas 1,
  • Armbands (white) 1,
  • Shorts Khaki Drill 2,
  • Shirts tropical 2,
  • Drawers cellular short 2,[7]
  • Hosetops (long socks) (prs) 1

This was a considerable amount of clothing and equipment to bring into stock for issues and for stockholding, not forgetting that the old uniforms and equipment that was been exchanged had to be sorted, stored and disposed of. To manage the workload, infrastructure would be required along with additional personnel. To supplement the NZOC military personnel, civilian labour would be utilised. Under the control of a supervisor know as a Rais (Arabic: رئیس‎; also spelled Raees), teams of workers known as Fellaheen (Arabic: فلاحين‎, fallāḥīn) would come into the BOD each day,[8] Over time locally employed civilians would not only carry out labouring work but also more complex warehousing and clerical functions providing a level of continuity that soldiers because of the demands of soldiering are often unable; to maintain.

Liaison with the RAOC depots was the key to the success of the NZ BOD. Held on the establishment of the NZ BOD, NZOC Liaison staff were attached to RAOC depots for the duration of the war, NZOC liaison staff would serve in both clerical and stores positions with a dual role; first the NZOC had no combined corporate history of ordnance procedures so the attachment would enable NZOC members to become familiar with current RAOC procedures, and secondly it allowed NZOC staff in RAOC depots to directly manage and process New Zealand demands.[9]

In June 1940, Lt Col King departed for England where he would facilitate the Ordnance support for the 2nd Echelon of the 2NZEF which had been diverted to England rather than Egypt, this would leave Major Andrews managing all the NZOC maintenance and supply functions in Egypt. With the 3rd Echelon arriving in Egypt in September 1940 planning on the future of the NZ BOD and the overall NZOC commitment to the NZEF with the drafting of new establishments underway. Correspondence between Andrew and King describes the growth of the NZ BOD into a quite large depot.[10]

BOD October 1940

Base Ordnance Depot Staff, Maadi, October 1940. Back Row clerks: G Gilbert-Smith, LCpl W.W Thomas, G Duane, O McKibbon. Front Row Storemen: M Ivey, R Watson, W Mooney. Photo W.W Thomas

By March 1941 the 2nd Echelon had arrived in Egypt from the United Kingdom and the New Zealand Division was complete for the first time. Although some units had been involved in operations against the Italians, the Divisions first real taste of battle would be the disastrous Greek and Crete campaigns. Although ad hoc NZOC workshops would be sent to Greece to support the LAD’s, the NZ BOD would only play a supporting role in these campaigns. In the months after the Greek and Crete campaign, the NZ Division would retrain and reorganise.

From April 1942 the DOS for the Middle East was weighing up the option of pooling all British and Dominion Base Ordnance units into one organisation under the DOS GHQ Middle East. Whilst retaining their national identity’s they world services all units regardless of nationality on a geographic basis. Stocks of common items would be demanded from the main British BOD, provisioned for and demanded by the DADOS (P) from the United Kingdom or the Eastern Supply Group. Items peculiar to each nation would be demanded independently by each national BOD. The NZEF replied that the NZ BOD at Maadi Camp had materially reduced the work of the RAOC Depots and that excellent liaison between the RAOC and NZOC existed and the proposed system was in effect the system in place and working quite satisfactorily.[11]

As a consequence of the NZ Divisions reorganisation, Divisional NZOC units were to be formed, with personnel from the NZ BOD, NZOC reinforcements and transfers from within the 2nd NZEF transferred to the following NZOC Field Force units prior to their formation; [12]

  • The New Zealand Divisional Ordnance Field Park (NZ OFP), formed 28 July 1941,
  • The NZ Divisional Salvage unit, formed 16 August 1941.
  • The New Zealand Divisional Mobile Bath Unit, formed 6 September 1941,
  • The New Zealand Divisional Mobile Laundry and Forward Decontamination unit, formed 22 September 1941.

Concurrent with the reorganisation of the 2nd NZEF after the Greek Campaign, the NZOC maintenance services would start to be formalised into a fully functional workshop system of Base, Divisional and field workshops. Following closely behind the British who with the increased mechanisation of the battlefield reformed its maintenance and repair organisations and form them into a single Corps of Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (EME) on 1 October 1942 assuming responsibility for all RAOC, ASC and Royal Engineer Workshops, Recovery Sections and LADs.  New Zealand and Australian would follow suit on 1 December 1942, followed by India on 1 May 1943 and Canada on 22 February 1944.[13]

Maadi 1941

An Italian trailer put to use in the NZ BOD at Maadi in 1941. Soldier is Jack Thompsom. Photo: H.L Gilbertson

In addition to the Divisional NZOC units, a New Zealand Advanced Ordnance Depot (NZAOD) was formed as sub-unit of the NZ BOD to facilitate the holding of stock closer to the forward areas. No additional personnel was authorised for the NZAOD, so when raised its personnel and equipment would be drawn from NZ BOD resources.[14]

BOD 41

The NZ AOD was initially located with an RAOC AOD at El Daba during Operation Crusader, [15]  with the NZ Division withdrawn back to Egypt in December 1941 the NZAOD had just unloaded its stock at the Tura caves when it was ordered to move with the Division to Syria where it set up in the vicinity of Baalbeck.

March 1942 would see the establishment of the NZ BOD increased to five Officers and 95 other ranks.

BOD MAR 42

Returning to Egypt with the NZ Division in June 1942, the NZAOD would gradually morph into a mobile depot and accompany the NZ Division the pursuit of the Axis forces into Tunisia.[16] On three occasions it would ground its stocks, at Bardia, Tripoli and Enfidaville. Due to its mobile nature, the NZAOD ended up utilising many of the NZ BOD’s limited holding f vehicles

Replenishment for the NZAOD would be direct from the NZ BOD for NZ specific items of supply. For items of a generic nature, replenishment would be from the closest supporting RAOC AOD, Forward Depot or Dump, if those units were unable to satisfy the indent, it would be pushed to the supporting RAOC BOD. New Zealand liaison staff in the RAOC depots would process the New Zealand indents and forward on the next available transport for delivery.

An example of the efficiency of the replenishment system is that when at Enfidaville the NZAOD sent a signal to RAOC 557 AOD, then at Tripoli, over 600km away. Within five days those stores were being issued to units if the Division.

Sys of Sup

 

October 1943 would see the NZEF begin operations in Italy as part of the 8th Army. The NZAOD would remain deployed forward in support of the NZ Division. Major Harper the DADOS of the NZ BOD also deployed into Italy to conduct an appreciation of the future NZ Ordnance Support required.  At the time of Major Harper’s appreciation, there was only one RAOC depot operating in support to the 8th Army. This was an ad hoc organisation called Eight Army Field Stores and was operating using stocks from the initial Ordnance Beach Detachments. The RAOC 500 AOD was in the process of getting organised at Bari on the Adriatic coast, with its limited stocks steadily been built up, few demands could satisfactory be met.[17] To improve the situation for the NZ Division and the NZEF, Harper recommended that rather rely on already stretched RAOC depots the NZ BOD be reformed into two Depots;

  • One part to service the NZEF in Egypt and to hold reserves of clothing for the whole NZEF,
  • The other part to be in Italy to service the NZ Division and other NZEF units in Italy, such as hospitals and the advance base.

Major Harper envisaged only a small increase in personnel and that the liaison staff with RAOC Depts remain incorporated in the new establishment.

As one of the factors of the NZ Divisions good equipment state was that it had always had its own BOD, which was now located far away in Egypt, and to maintain the NZ Division in a comparable manner as it had been in North Africa, Harper’s recommendation that the BOD be split into two sections was approved by the GOC  2 NZEF on 4 Nov 1942. Major Harper was instructed to make arrangement to obtain the required buildings and stores accommodation in Bari and then return to Egypt to assist in the arrangements to split the NZ BOD for the move to Italy.[18]

From 10 November 1943, the NZ BOD split into three distinct sections

  • Ordnance Depot at Base (Egypt)
  • Ordnance Depot at Advance Base (Italy), and
  • NZAOD

The significant change is that the NZAOD was established as a standalone section, whereas in the previous year’s its personnel and equipment had been taken out of the establishment the NZ BOD, the NZAOD was now recognised separate section with its own personnel and equipment.

A change in the boot repair contract in Maadi had also necessitated an increase on the establishment of Shoemakers and Bootmakers to enable the NZ BOD to become self-sufficient in the area in boot repair.

The NZ BOD would also be the reinforcement depot for the NZOC. Reinforcements from NZ or individuals injured in units and withdrawn to the rear to convalesce would be held in the reinforcement depot until appropriate vacancies became available in forward units.

NZOC personnel on liaison duties with ROAC depots also cease to be held in the establishment of the NZ BOD.

BOD NOV 43

BOD Staff Dec 1943

Main Office Staff, 1 Base Ordnance Depot, Maadi, Egypt, December 1943. Standing: Ike Dabscheck, Stone, Lieutenant Stroud, Major Cordery, Lieutenant Barwick, Unidentified. In front: Jack Picot, Geff Rees, Falloon. Photo: J.D Picot

Early in 1944, it was decided that given the distance between Egypt and Italy that the NZ BOD Ordnance Depot at Advance Base in Bari should be upgraded to full Base Depot Status. With effect 16 February the following changes to establishments were made;

  • NZ BOD was renamed 1 NZ Base Ordnance Depot, (1 NZ BOD)
  • 2 NZ Base Ordnance Depot was formed as a unit of the NZEF (2 NZ BOD)
  • The NZAOD was disbanded.

Change to 1BOD

2 BOD Formed

Changing from NZ BOD to 1 NZ BOD, this unit’s establishment would be reduced to two Officers and 37 Other ranks, retaining responsibility as the bulk holding depot for items peculiar to NZ and the reaming base units in Egypt, No1 NZ BOD would be the Reinforcement Depot for NZOC and would also include Includes a Officers shop detail.  An Officers Shop detail was also added to the responsibilities of 1 NZ OFP. Officers shops were an organisation developed by the British in North Africa. Centrally provisioned by the Central Provision Office, Officers Shops allowed Offices to buy at reasonable rates, authorised items of kit such as clothing, camp kit, travel bags, Leather jerkins and shoes.[19]

The NZAOD would be also disbanded and its functions absorbed into the NZ OFP mobile AOD section.[20]

NZAOD DISBANDED FEB 1944

From the existing NZ BOD Ordnance Depot at Advance Base in Bari, 2 NZ BOD would be formed as a unit of the NZEF. Carrying out the same role as the NZ BOD in North Africa 2 NZ BOD would be a Reinforcement Depot for NZOC Personnel and include a Stores Convoy Unit.

Stores Convoy Units were a capability that was generated by the early lessons of the desert war, and although utilised by both the NZ OFP and NZAOD during 1942/43 the system was not formally organised as a unit in the NZEF until 1944. The supply and transportation of Ordnance Stores is something which was not always understood and more complex than the supply and transportation of Rations, Fuel and Ammunition. Except for a small range of fast moving items, Ordnance stores consist of a very large range of stores, for which the actual need of the users cannot be anticipated with any certainty. It is impractical to hold stocks close to the forward units as the assets required to move these stocks are not realistic, therefore a reliable and fast service was required to supply urgent requirements from the nearest stock holding unit – often the BOD. Rail had many limitations which made urgent deliveries impactable as was the use of Army Service Corps (ASC) assets who on regular runs failed to meet the delivery requirements. Therefore, it became necessary to introduce a road convoy service dedicated to the transportation of Ordnance Stores. Originally operated by using reserve vehicles from the RAOC 1 OFP and 1st Cavalry Division OFP, the system originally operated between Cairo and Mersa Matruh supplementing the existing rail system. The system proved successful and was extended to the delivery of vehicles other urgent fighting stores direct to divisional OFP’s across the Middle East theatre form Persia to Tunisia. [21]  The New Zealand Stores Convoy Unit would operate from 1944 into 1945 along the entire axis of the New Zealand’s Divisions advance through Italy from Bari to Trieste.

2NZEF Ordnance

A group of NZAOD personnel Italy 1944. Front Row: H.D Bremmer, R.G James, 2nd Lieutenant H.J Mackridge, N.G Hogg, G.P Seymour. Back Row: WO2 Worth, D.S Munroe, G Caroll, C Moulder, E.W.T Barnes, H Rogers, C.W Holmes, W Wallace, N Denery Photo: Defence Archive Collection, Alexander Turnbull Library.

As the NZ Division advanced up the Italian peninsular HQ 2 NZEF also wised to shorten the lines of communication and remain close to the Division, and on 11 September HQ 2 NZEF relocated to Senigallia. The headquarters move to Senigallia was soon followed by many of the administrative units including 2NZ BOD which established an Advanced Section of Depot of one Officer and 20 Other Ranks.

2 BOD OCT 44

Although the Officers shop details have been active since February 1944, formal approval for the establishment of Officers shops was not granted in April 1945 with the following officer’s shops to be added to establishments;

  • 1 NZ BOD – One Officer Shop Detail
  • 2 NZ BOD – Two Officer Shop details, (Bari and Senigallia)
  • NZ OFP, AOD Section – One Officer Shop Detail.

Germany surrendered on 7 May 1945, bringing hostility’s in Europe to a close, but in the Pacific and South East Asia the war against Japan was still in progress and discussion of the future of the NZEF and its future in the war was underway. By June 1945 the decision had been made to maintain NZOC units in the NZEF at full strength to facilitate the handing back of vehicles and equipment by Divisional units as they were demobilised or reorganised for service against Japan. In June 1945 103 personnel from Divisional NZOC units were placed on the establishment of 2 NZ BOD but attached to RAOC units, the bulk to the RAOC 557 BOD at Naples to facilitate the handing back of equipment and also the distribution of new equipment for the force been raised for operations against Japan

2 BOD NOV 45

The August atomic bombing of Japan and their subsequent surrender in September 1945 brought what was going to be a long war to a sudden end. Japan would be occupied by allied forces and New Zealand would contribute a Brigade group (J Force) based on the 9th Infantry Brigade of the 2nd NZEF.[22]

By November the 2 NZ BOD Advanced Section of Depot at Senigallia had been disbanded and the establishment of 2 NZ BOD reduced to five Officers and 42 Other ranks. The personnel of the 2 NZ BOD Advance Section of Depot were transferred to Florence where they married up with the NZ OFP to form a final NZAOD to support the demobilisation of the 2nd NZEF. The liaison staff to the RAOC depots had also been reduced from the original 103 to five Officers and thirty-eight Other Ranks.[23]

Both 1 and 2 NZ BOD would spend the remaining months of 1945 packing and returning equipment to New Zealand, clearing Depots and returning stocks to the ROAC. By 1 February 1946 after close to six years of providing Ordnance support to the 2nd NZEF the Base Ordnance Depots and the NZAOD of the NZOC were formally disbanded and the final NZOC troops headed for home or to Japan for service with J Force.

1946

Like all of the NZOC units of the 2nd NZEF, the role that the NZ BOD played in supporting the 2nd NZEF has hardly rated a mention in many of the contemporary histories of the 2nd NZEF. But considering that it was a unit started from scratch and had to learn its trade on the job under wartime conditions it is a unit worthy of recognition. Providing the 76000 New Zealand Troops that passed through Maadi Camp, and maintaining the NZ Division over vast distances with all manner of war material was a huge achievement and one never to matched in the history of the New Zealand Army.

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes

[1] W. G. Stevens, Problems of 2 Nzef, Official History of New Zealand in the Second World War 1939-45 (Wellington, N.Z: War History Branch, Dept of Internal Affairs, 1958, 1958), Non-fiction, 93.

[2] Brigadier A.H Fernyhough C.B.E. M.C, History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1920-1945 (London: Royal Army Ordnance Corps, 1965), 110-11.

[3] 1939-1948 New Zealand Army WWII Nominal Rolls, “Roll 1: 1939 – 31 Mar 1940,”  https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/1832/31839_224118__0001-00003?backurl=https%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fsearch%2fdb.aspx%3fdbid%3d1832%26path%3d&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnBrowsing#?imageId=31839_224118__0001-00042.

[4] Frank Steer, To the Warrior His Arms: The Story of the Raoc 1918–1993 (London: RAOC, 2005), 73.

[5] Peter Cooke, Warrior Craftsmen, Rnzeme 1942-1996 (Wellington: Defense of New Zealand Study Group, 2017), 72.

[6] Stevens, Problems of 2 Nzef, 21-22.

[7] Short cellular drawers or underwear were issued to British and Commonwealth troops for wear in summer and for general wear in tropical areas. They were white open-weave ‘cellular’ fabric, featuring a two-button fastening to the front opening and a pair of horizontal cloth loops to either side of the front waistband.

[8] Major J.S Bolton, A History of the Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (Trentham: RNZAOC, 1992), 106.

[9] Ibid., 102-03.

[10] 2nzef – Organisation and War Establishments – Ordnance – Base, Item Idr20107591 Record No  Da 1/9/Sd81/22 (Wellington: New Zealand Archives, 1941).

[11] Ibid.

[12] 2nzef – Organisation and War Establishments – Ordnance – Field Item Idr20107590 Record No  Da 1/9/Sd81/21 (Wellington: New Zealand Archives, 1941).

[13] Cooke, Warrior Craftsmen, Rnzeme 1942-1996, 72-122.

[14] 2nzef – Organisation and War Establishments – Ordnance – Base.

[15] Listed in some records as the RAOC 508 AOD it might actually be 500 AOD as no record exists of an RAOC 508 AOD.

[16] It is assumed that the NZAOD was co-located with the NZ OFP when in the mobile role.

[17] Brigadier A.H Fernyhough C.B.E. M.C, History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1920-1945, 243.

[18] 2nzef – Organisation and War Establishments – Ordnance – Base.

[19] History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1920-1945, 205.

[20] 2nzef – Organisation and War Establishments – Ordnance – Field

[21] History of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1920-1945, 120.

[22] Matthew Wright, Italian Odyssey: New Zealanders in the Battle for Italy 1943-45 (Auckland, N.Z: Reed, 2003, 2003), Bibliographies, Non-fiction, 166.

[23] 2nzef – Organisation and War Establishments – Ordnance – Base.