NZAOC June 1938 to May 1939

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC on the 31st May 1939 was 151 consisting of:

  • 6 Officers
  • 28 Permanent Other Ranks
  • 113 Civilian Staff

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Ordnance Officer

  • Captain E. L. G. Bown, NZSC
  • Captain H. E. Erridge

Ordnance Officer (Provision)

  • Lieutenant A. H. Andrews, BE

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain D. L. Lewis

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Lieutenant D. Nicol

Inspecting Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant I. R. Withell, RNZA

Ordnance Mechanical Engineer, Trentham

  • Captain S. B. Wallace, B.E. NZAOC

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS

 

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1939

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1939

Consequent upon the increase in the establishment of the Territorial Force and the continuous work that would have to be done in the future in connection with preparations for mobilization, a considerable increase in staff was identified as necessary.

Ordnance Services

The NZAOC was responsible for;

  • the provision, distribution, repair, examination, and maintenance of small arms, machine guns, vehicles, clothing, equipment, and general stores;
  • the inspection and repair of armament and inspection of gun ammunition ;
  • the receipt, testing, storage, and issue of small-arms ammunition;
  • the organization and control of ordnance workshops.

There had been a considerable increase in Ordnance work during the last eight months. Equipment tables for all Territorial units except Artillery had been prepared, and the issue of equipment was proceeding. Camp-equipment stocks have been completely revised in the light of the altered establishments, and considerable purchases have been effected.

Ordnance Store Buildings and Workshops

The new carpenters’ workshop at Trentham, Main Ordnance Depot was under construction. The first section of the large Ordnance store building at Trentham was nearing completion, and a contract had been let for the second section. The completion of this store will alleviate the serious shortage of storage space at Trentham, and will at the same time make available additional barrack-rooms for the accommodation of troops attending the Schools of Instruction. A contract had also been let for the first section of a similar Ordnance store at Burnham and clearing operations on the site commenced.

Credits

The sum of £41,705 19s. 10d. has been received for the sale of rifles, ammunition, cordite, cloth, trimmings, waste products, etc

Arms

A supply of short M.L.E. Mark 111 heavy Lithgow barrels and of M.L.E. converted Lithgow barrels was received from the Australian Government for sale to members of Defence rifle clubs. The first consignment of Bren guns was received from England with an armourers’ course on this particular type of gun was held in February 1939.

Clothing and Equipment

Much difficulty had been experienced in purchasing certain items necessary for mobilization, and if the NZAOC was to be in a position to function efficiently immediately on mobilization it was identified to Government that ordering of additional stocks would have to procured and held in peace. This was recognized in principle, and the clothing and equipment situation for mobilization improved, but much remained to be done. Considerable progress had been made with the manufacture of blue uniforms, and to date over 3,400 had been issued. The uniform had received the most favourable reception.

Quartermasters’ Course

The Southern Ordnance Depot assisted the Southern Military School at Burnham. The school conducted a  special course for quartermasters, drawn from the various Territorial units of the Southern Military District. The Southern Ordnance Depot provided instruction on the are and preservation of clothing and ordnance equipment.

Personnel Movements -June 1938 to May 1939

Promotions

  • Major King to Lieutenant Colonel, 1 June 1938

Releases

  • Armourer Staff Sergeant Andrew Archibald Young, MSM
  • Lieutenant Alfred William Baldwin

 

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

 

 

 

 


NZAOC June 1937 to May 1938

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC on the 31st May 1938 was 34 consisting of:

  • 6 Officers
  • 28 Permanent Other Ranks

Establishment Review

It was identified due to the recent and pending increases in armament, instruments, and equipment generally, and in the proposed further distribution of mobilization equipment to districts. then an increase in the NZAOC establishment would be required in the following areas;

  • armament and armourer sections,
  • clerical division,
  • General division with store-men and tradesmen.

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer Trentham Camp

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Ordnance Officers

  • Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC

Ordnance Officer (Provision)

  • Captain  H. E. Erridge

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant D. L. Lewis

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C, NZSC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Lieutenant D. Nicol

Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant I. R. Withell, RNZA

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant S. B. Wallace

Officer In Charge, Ordnance Workshop, Trentham

  • Lieutenant A.H Andrews, BE

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS
NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1938

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1938

New Ordnance Badges

By 1936, stocks of the 1917 pattern Cap badge had been exhausted, with only collar badges remaining in stock. The Director of Ordnance Services of the time proposed to the Quartermaster General that existing stocks of the NZEF NZAOC badge (180 Cap Badges, 319 Pairs of Collar Badges) be used as a replacement, and the current badge be made obsolete.  The Quartermaster General did not authorise the replacement of the 1917 Badge but did allow the use of the NZEF NZAOC Badge until the provision of new badges could be arranged from the UK.

The Director of Ordnance Services counted with a proposal in February 1937 with a design for a new NZAOC badge, which was a similar pattern to the current RAOC Badge which had been introduced in 1918. The New Zealand Badge differed from the RAOC version by having the Inscription “New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps” in the Annulus field, and the inscription “Sua Tela Tonanti” in the Riband. The new design was approved on the 31st of May 1937.

RNZAOC hat and collar 1937-1947

RNZAOC hat and collar 1937-1947. Robert McKie collection

Ordnance Services

The NZAOC was responsible for;

  • the provision, distribution, repair, examination, and maintenance of small arms, machine guns, vehicles, clothing, equipment, and general stores;
  • the inspection and repair of armament and inspection of gun ammunition ;
  • the receipt, testing, storage, and issue of small-arms ammunition;
  • the organization and control of ordnance workshops.

The constant changes in the organisation of units and in equipment generally,  as adopted in England, had very much complicated and increased the Ordnance work in New Zealand. Much remained to be done in the repair, maintenance, and modernization of arms and equipment, in the receipt, storage, and issue of stores and equipment from abroad, and in preparation for mobilisation.

Credits

The sum of £24,776 had been received as credits for the sale of rifles, ammunition, and cordite, cloth and trimmings to contractors, obsolete and unserviceable stores, waste products, etc.

Arms

Good progress had been made with the stripping, cleaning, and preservation of rifles S.M.L.E., Mark III. The stock of barrels brought in 1920 for sale to rifle clubs had now become exhausted. The question of the provision of a suitable barrel was referred to the National Rifle Association, and, as a result of the recommendation received, inquiries are being made from Australia regarding the provision of such a barrel.

Small-arms Ammunition

Proof of ammunition held in magazines throughout the Dominion manufactured between the years 1929-33 was carried out, all ammunition tested was passed as fit for rifle use.

Clothing

The provision of a blue uniform for the Territorial Force had been approved. Four thousand uniforms were manufactured for issue this year.

Store Buildings and Workshops

The extension to the fitters’ shops at the Ordnance Workshops, Trentham, was completed, and the erection of the new carpenters’ shop planned for construction. A contract for the first section of the large Ordnance Store required at Trentham was let and it was proposed to accelerate the construction of the remainder of the buildings. Plans were prepared for the buildings required at the Ordnance Depots at Ngaruawahia and Burnham, and for the rebuilding of the Ordnance Workshop, Devonport.

 

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018


NZAOC June 1936 to May 1937

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC on the 31st May 1937 was 34 consisting of:

  • 6 Officers, and
  • 28 Other ranks.

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Ordnance Officers

  • Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC

Ordnance Officer (provision)

  • Captain H. E. Erridge

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant D. L. Lewis

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C, NZSC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Lieutenant D. Nicol

Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Captain I. R. Withell, RNZA

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Vacant

Officer In Charge, Ordnance Workshop, Trentham

  • Lieutenant A.H Andrews, BE[1]

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS

Four Armourer recruits were enlisted during the year, they had undergone training and made good progress. In addition, two Armourer recruits for the RNZAF had also made satisfactory progress. In November 1936 a course of instruction for all Armourers was held. This course was very successful and helped to coordinate the work of inspection of arms throughout the Dominion.

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1937

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1937

 

NZAOC Activities

NZAOC personnel has been engaged throughout the year in the following activities :

  • Care, preservation, turnover, and accounting for all stores, arms, equipment, and clothing held in Ordnance Depots.
  • Receipt and classification of clothing returned from Territorials and Cadets. Allocation of clothing for dry-cleaning and renovation, and examination on return from dry cleaning contractors.
  • Examination of new clothing supplied by contractors.
  • Annual inspection of rifles and light machine guns on charge to Territorial Units and Cadets, and half-yearly inspection of Vickers guns.
  • The issue of camp equipment and training stores for camps, bivouacs, and courses of instruction throughout the Dominion, also hire of stores to various organizations.
  • Sales of rifles and barrels to gunsmiths, to rifle clubs, and to the general public, and sales of S.A.A. to rifle clubs.

Routine issues of clothing, arms, equipment, S.A.A. and expendable stores. No progress has been made during the year with the stripping, cleaning, and preservation of the balance of the rifles, S.M.L.E. Mark III, held in store, and which have not been examined since receipt from the United Kingdom in 1920. Authority had been obtained, however, for the engagement of four arms-cleaners, and the work has now started.

Credits

Received as credits for the sale of rifles, ammunition, and cordite – £16,573 Is. 10d.

Provision of cloth and trimmings to contractors; waste products, etc. £4,751 5s. 11d. (This represents the proceeds of sales of cloth and trimmings to contractors for use in the manufacture of Territorial clothing.)

Accommodation

The accommodation for mobilization stores at Trentham remained very unsatisfactory.

Arms Sales

The sales of small arms to rifle clubs and the general public continued during the year. The total value of rifles, barrels, and components sold during the year, ending 31st March 1937 was £3,166 75, which was about £1,000 more than any previous total during recent years. These sales involve a considerable amount of work for the NZAOC Armourers, but this was counterbalanced by the returns.

Director of Ordnance Services visit to Australia

As the guest of the Commonwealth Government of Australia, The Director of Ordnance Services paid a six-week visit to Australia at the end of 1936. During this visit, he inspected the munition establishments of the Commonwealth and visited the Ordnance establishments at Melbourne and Sydney. He also carried out an investigation into the accounting system of the Royal Australian Air Force. Much of the information obtained will be of value in the future.

Workshops

The new instrument workshop at Trentham was occupied in August 1936 and provides greatly increased facilities for repairs. There was a large amount of Armourers’ work in arrears, but owing to the shortage of staff, it was not been possible to undertake it.

Cap Badges

By 1936, stocks of the 1917 pattern Cap badge had been exhausted, with only collar badges remaining in stock. The Director of Ordnance Services of the time proposed to the Quartermaster General that existing stock of the NZEF NZAOC badge (180 Cap Badges, 319 Pairs of Collar Badges) be used as a replacement, and the current badge be made obsolete.  The Quartermaster General did not authorise the replacement of the 1917 Badge but did allow the use of the NZEF NZAOC Badge until the provision of new badges could be arranged from the UK.

20180605_195417-190082474.jpg

New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps Badge, 1916-1919 (Robert McKie Collection 2017)

The Director of Ordnance Services counted with a proposal in February 1937 with a design for a new NZAOC badge, which was a similar pattern to the current RAOC Badge which had been introduced in 1918. The New Zealand Badge differed from the RAOC version by having the Inscription “New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps” in the Annulus field, and the inscription “Sua Tela Tonanti” in the Riband. The new design was approved on the 31st of May 1937.

20190719_142632

New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, Officer Gilt, Silver and Enamel Badge. 1937-1947, Robert McKie Collection.

RNZAOC hat and collar 1937-1947

RNZAOC hat and collar 1937-1947. Robert McKie collection

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes:

[1] Alan Huia Andrews, BE to be Lieutenant, 17 June 1936. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfers of Officers of the NZ Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 44  (1936).


NZAOC June 1935 to May 1936

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC on 31 May 1936 was 30, consisting of;

  • 5 Officers,
  • 25 Permanent Other Ranks

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King,

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Ordnance Officers

  • Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC

Ordnance Officer (Provision)

  • Captain H. E. Erridge

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant D. L. Lewis

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Lieutenant D. Nicol

Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Captain I. R. Withell, RNZA

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant S. B. Wallace.[1]

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS

Officers

Some improvement had been effected in the position that existed last year. One junior officer was sent to England to attend the Ordnance Mechanical Engineers’ Course, another with a B.E. degree had been identified for appointment after experience in a civilian workshop to be  posted to the Main Ordnance Depot at Trentham. An additional officer should be appointed this year for administrative work at the Main Ordnance Depot.

Other Ranks (Including Civilians)

Four men were selected for appointment as armourers and will be trained under a Warrant Officer (Armourer Sergeant-Major) from the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, England, who had recently been appointed. An additional instrument-repairer (ex-Warrant Officer, R.A.0.C.) had also been appointed. Two armourers for the Royal N.Z. Air Force will receive their initial training at the same time. A laboratory foreman, whose duties comprise the testing of gun ammunition, had received training in Australia during the year.

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1936

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1936

Ordnance Services

The NZAOC was responsible for;

  • the provision, distribution, repair, examination, and maintenance of small arms, machine guns, vehicles, clothing, equipment, and general stores;
  • the inspection and repair of armament and inspection of gun ammunition ;
  • the receipt, testing, storage, and issue of small-arms ammunition;
  • the organization and control of ordnance workshops.

Equipment and stores required for the Territorial Force had been maintained during the year in serviceable condition. Very careful attention had been paid to the inspection and testing of small-arms ammunition, some of the older stocks of which showed signs of serious deterioration. All ammunition issued for use in rifles was carefully tested before issue, and ammunition found unfit for rifles were either issued for use in machine guns or broken up, according to its condition.

Equipment and Stores

It had not been possible to effect any improvement in the very unsatisfactory position regarding reserves of equipment and stores, as reported in the previous year.

Stores Buildings and Workshops

Sketch plans of additional storage and workshop accommodation at Trentham had been prepared for inclusion in the latest estimates. The buildings required comprise two large storehouses, to be served by an extension of the existing railway siding, and various additions and alterations to the workshops. A substantial economy in staff and administrative expenses would result from the carrying out of this work.

At Burnham Camp, a small building to accommodate single civilian personnel of the Ordnance Depot had been erected, but additions were required to meet an increase in the number of men employed at this camp.

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

 

Notes:

[1] Relinquished the appointment of Assistant IOO and OEM to attend a course in England 15 February 1936. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfers of Officers of the NZ Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 19 (1936).


NZAOC June 1934 to May 1935

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC on the 31st May 1935 was 29 consisting of:[1]

  • 5 Officers, and
  • 24 Other ranks.

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer Trentham Camp

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Ordnance Officer

  • Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC

Ordnance Officer (Provision)

  • Captain H. E. Erridge. [2] [3]

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant D. L. Lewis

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Lieutenant D. Nicol

Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Captain R. Withell, RNZA

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant S. B. Wallace.

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS. 
NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1935

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1935

It had not been possible, for financial reasons, to follow any progressive policy during the past few years in the appointment of officers to the NZAOC. The officers of the corps are of two classes;

  • Administrative, and
  • Technical.

The small numbers involved made it essential that appointments be made with careful regard to age and the necessity for technical training abroad. It was planned that two junior officers —one for administrative work and one for technical work—would be appointed as soon as funds permit, with one officer to attend the Ordnance Mechanical Engineers’ Course in England in 1936.  Special attention was being paid to the provision of armourers and instrument artificers. The position as regards armament-artificers was satisfactory, but appointments of young men for training as armourers and for instrument-repair work needed to be made as soon as practicable.[4]

 Ordnance Services

The NZAOC was responsible for;

  • the provision, distribution, repair, examination, and maintenance of small arms, machine guns, vehicles, clothing, equipment, and general stores;
  • the inspection and repair of armament and inspection of gun ammunition;
  • the receipt, testing, storage, and issue of small-arms ammunition;
  • the organization and control of ordnance workshops.

Equipment and stores required for the Territorial Force had been maintained during the year in serviceable condition. Very careful attention had been paid to the inspection and testing of small-arms ammunition, some of the older stocks of which showed signs of serious deterioration. All ammunition issued for use in rifles was carefully tested before issue, and ammunition found unfit for rifles was either issued for use in machine guns or broken up, according to its condition.

Equipment and Stores

The situation regarding equipment and stores was far from satisfactory. Financial limitations had made it impossible to build up an adequate reserve of equipment and stores or to maintain those reserves that existed. These stores could not be obtained in New Zealand, nor would they be available until at least six months after the outbreak of war. Apart from the provision of stores, a considerable amount of leeway had to be made up in carrying out alterations and additions to existing equipment. Shortage of skilled personnel and small stores, and inadequate workshops and machinery, together with the increased demands made upon them, were responsible for the present situation. Unfortunately, financial limitations permitted no progress made in remedying this position. An issue of boots has been made to all ranks of the Territorial Force during the past year which proved satisfactory in every way.

Stores Buildings and Workshops

The Ordnance Depots were situated at Ngaruawahia, Trentham, and Burnham. The storage accommodation at Ngaruawahia and Burnham was reasonably satisfactory. At Trentham, where the greater quantity of reserve stores was held, the store buildings consist of the wooden hutments erected to accommodate troops during the war. Most of these buildings still have a considerable ” life,” but the layout is uneconomical in staff and administration and insufficient to accommodate any considerable increase in the quantity of stock held. The stores required on mobilization cannot, under present conditions, be segregated and laid out as they should be. It was proposed that when finance became available, to erect a modern store building at Trentham which will increase the storage available and anticipate the deterioration of the present wooden buildings.

The principal workshop is at Trentham. Small workshops exist at North Head, Auckland, and Burnham, Canterbury. These workshops carry out repair and maintenance work on guns, howitzers, vehicles, machine guns, rifles, optical and other instruments, and miscellaneous small items. A marked increase in this work was expected with the advent of the new armament for coast defences and other equipment. A considerable extension of the workshop at Trentham is overdue,  but could not be undertaken with the finances available in the vote.

Cricket

The Trentham Ordnance Depot contributed a team to the Upper Hutt League of the Wellington Cricket Association competition playing the known games

  • 17 November 1934 – Ordnance Vs Methodist
  • 24 November 1934 – Ordnance Vs Upper Hutt
  • 31 November 1934 – Ordnance Vs Trentham A
  • 8 December 1934 – Ordnance Vs St Josephs
  • 14 December 1934 – Ordnance Vs Upper Hutt B
  • 11 January 1935 – Ordnance Vs Training Depot
  • 14 February 1935 – Ordnance Vs Upper Hutt A
  • 22 February 1935 – Ordnance Vs St. Josephs
  • 29 February 1935 – Ordnance Vs Upper Hutt A
  • 2 March 1935 – Ordnance Vs Upper Hutt B
  • 9 March 1935 – Ordnance vs Training Depot
  • 16 March 1935 – Ordnance Vs Trentham B

The position of the teams at the end of the first round in the 1934/Upper Hutt Cricket League competition was :

  • Ordnance – 45 points
  • Training Depot – 44
  • Trentham – B 40
  • Upper Hutt A – 26
  • St. Joseph’s – 25
  • Methodist – 7
  • Trentham A – 16
  • Upper Hutt B – 11
Ord Cricket Team

Ordnance Cricket Team – 1934-35 Maidstone Park Upper Hutt. RNZAOC School

Personnel Movements -July 1934 to June 1936

Releases

  • Armourer Staff Sergeant Frederick Henry Dew

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes:

[1] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces from 1 June 1934 to 31 May 1935,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1935).

[2] Promoted to Captain 1 December 1934 “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “, New Zealand Gazette No 87, 29 November 1934.

[3] Appointed Ordnance Office (Provision) Main Ordnance Depot July 1934.”Personal Items Nicol, Erridge,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXXI, Issue 21862, 26 July 1934.

[4] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces from 1 June 1934 to 31 May 1935.”

 

 

 


NZAOC June 1931 to May 1932

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC between June 1931 and May 1932 was;[1]

  • 2 Officers
  • 18 Permanent Other Ranks

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer Trentham Camp

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Main Ordnance Depot

  • Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC.

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant J. W. Barry, N.Z. Staff Corps

 Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W.R Burge, MC, NZSC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge, NZAOC.[2]
  • Lieutenant D. Nicol, NZAOC.[3]

Inspecting Officer Ordnance and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Major W Ivory, RNZA

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Captain I. R. Withell, RNZA

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition, Auckland

  • Captain I. R. Withell, RNZA
  • Honorary Lieutenant J.W Fletcher, NZPS.[4]

NZAOC appropriations year ending March 1932

Obituary

Mr W Ramsy a former member of the NZAOC passed away at New Plymouth after a brief illness on 15 May 1932. The late Mr Ramsay was a native of Glasgow, and before coming to New Zealand had seen service with the British Army in various parts of the world. He attained the rank of sergeant-major in the 18th. Hussars and later was stationed with the Army- Service Corps in Malta. Shortly after’ his arrival’ in Wellington, the war broke out, and almost immediately he joined up with the Defence Department staff. Transferring into the NZAOC on it formation as a Conductor, Ramsey was soon promoted to Lieutenant, taking his release when reaching the retiring age for his rank in 1920.[5]

Copyright © Robert McKie 2019

Notes:

[1] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1931 to May 1932,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1932).

[2] John J. Storey and J. Halket Millar, March Past: A Review of the First Fifty Years of Burnham Camp (Christchurch, N.Z.: Pegasus Press, 1973, 1974 printing, 1973), Non-fiction, 118.

[3] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1933 to May 1934,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1934): 1.

[4] Appointed 1 Sept 1931 NZ General Order 353/1931

[5] “Obituary Ramsey,” Evening Post, Volume CXIII, Issue 114, 16 May 1932.


NZAOC June 1930 to May 1931

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC on 31st May 1931 was 21 consisting of;[1] [2] [3]

  • 2 Officers
  • 19 Permanent Other Ranks

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer 

  • Captain W. R. Burge, M.C., NZSC

Main Ordnance Depot

  • Captain W. M. Bell, NZAOC.[4]
  • Captain E.L.G Bown, NZSC. [5]

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain F. E. Ford, NZAOC.[6] [7]
  • Lieutenant J.W Barry, NZSC. [8] [9]

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge NZAOC.[10]

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

Inspecting Officer Ordnance and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Major W Ivory, RNZA

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant I. R. Withell, RNZA

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition

  • Lieutenant M.J Lyons
  • Captain I. R. Withell, RNZA
NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1931

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1931

Mass Retrenchment

With the Depression affecting the New Zealand economy, the NZAOC was forced to retrench many of its staff. This was achieved by using the provisions of section 39 of the Finance Act, 1930 (No. 2) and by transferring staff to the Civil service.[16]

The Finance Act, 1930 (No. 2) authorized the retirement on superannuation of any member of the Permanent Force or the Permanent Staff under the Defence Act, 1909, or of the clerical staff of the Defence Department whose age or length of service was such that if five years was added thereto they would have been enabled as of right or with the consent of the Minister of Defence to have given notice to retire voluntarily. Using this act a total of six officers and Thirty-eight other ranks of the NZAOC were retired on superannuation as from the 31st March 1931. Seventy-four NZAOC staff (excluding officers and artificers) who were not eligible for retirement were transferred to the civil staff to work in the same positions but at a lower rate of pay. [17]

1931 Napier Earthquake Relief

On account of the disastrous earthquake that struck Napier and Hastings on the 3rd February 1931, the NZAOC was called upon at short notice to supply tents, blankets, bedding, cooking and eating utensils, for use in the stricken areas. The total value of the stores issued from the Ordnance Stores at Trentham was £35,000. The Ordnance staff did particularly good work in dispatching these stores and equipment. All members of the military staff in the earthquake area were detailed for relief work, as well as personnel from other centres, and on the 6th March 1931, there were twelve officers and forty-six other ranks employed in connection with the relief camps. All ranks engaged in the relief effort were deserving of great credit for the manner in which they carried out their duties under trying conditions.[18]

Obituary

Staff Sergeant Sydney C. Tennyson of the Burnham Ordnance Depot passed away on 22 July 1930.  Born at Peckham, London, in 1892, Staff-sergeant Tennyson enlisted with H Battery of the Royal Horse Artillery in 1906. He saw hard fighting during the Great War, serving with the famous H Battery throughout the campaign. He was promoted to Staff Sergeant fitter in 1917 and gained his discharge from the British Army in 1920, with a total service of 13 years 142 days. Coming to New Zealand, Staff-sergeant Tennyson joined the NZAOC in 1923. SSgt Tennyson was accorded a military funeral.[19]

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The funeral of Staff Sergeant S. C. Tennyson, of the N.Z. Army Ordnance Corps, entering the Bromley Cemetery. Members of the firing party lined the pathway leading to the graveside. Christchurch City Libraries

Ordnance Workshops Mount Cook

The Ordnance workshop located at Mount Cook was relocated to Trentham Camp.[20]

Personnel Movements -June 1930 to May 1931

Releases

  • 62        Private Frank Jewiss
  • 665      Private William Alexander Sammons
  • 714      Lance Corporal Kenneth Hoare
  • 966      Lance Corporal William Terrington Popple
  • 1001    Private George Cumming Bremner
  • 75300  Private William Valentine Wood
  • 1004    Lance Corporal James Johnston Bolt
  • 1009    Lance Corporal John Campbell Myers
  • 39        Corporal Simon Alexander Fraser
  • 55        Corporal John Francis Hunter
  • 111      Corporal John Sawyer
  • 19        Sergeant Alfred Charles Butler
  • 920      Corporal Gordon James Francis Arenas
  • 961      Corporal Edgar Charles Beal Boult
  • 965      Corporal Philip Alexander MacKay
  • 974      Corporal Henry William Le Comte
  • 978      Corporal Earnest John Williams
  • 960      Sergeant Frank William Ching
  • 968      Sergeant Thomas Alexander Hunter
  • 166      Sergeant William John Rabbidge
  • 956      Staff Sergeant Saddler George Alexander Carter
  • 213      Staff Sergeant William Saul Keegan
  • 995      Staff Sergeant Wilfred Robert White
  • 268      Staff Quartermaster Sergeant James Alexander Kenning
  • 143      Armament Sergeant Major Joseph Warren
  • 1018    Sergeant Major James Oliver Pringle Southgate
  • Lieutenant Michael Joseph Lyons. [21]
  • Captain W. M. Bell. [22] [23]
  • Captain F. E. Ford. [24] [25]
  • Captain A. R. C. White. [26]

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

 

Notes:

[1] “Permanent Forces,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVII, Issue 20619, 18 July 1930.

[2] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1930 to May 1931,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives, 1 January 1941  (1931): 6.

[3] “B-07 Appropriations Chargeable on the Consolidated Fund and Other Accounts for the Year Ending 31 March 1931,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1931).

[4]relinquished appointment of OO Main Depot 15 December 1930  “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 27  (1931): 969.

[5] Appointed Ordnance Officer Main Ordnance Depot 22 April 1931. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 40  (1931): 1549.

[6] Relinquished appointment of OO Northern Command 30 Jan 1931 “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,”  969.

[7] Released 30 January 1931 “Defence Cuts,” Evening Post, Volume CXI, Issue 84, 10 April 1931.

[8] Seconded for Service with NZAOC as Ordnance Officer Northern Command 31 January 1931. “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “, New Zealand Gazette No 16  (1931).

[9] Appointed Officer in Charge Waikato Camp, Ngaruawahia in addition to appointment of OO Northern Command. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 73  (1931): 2154.

[10] Relinquished appointment of OO Main Ordnance Depot 20 December 1930″Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 16  (1931): 515.

[11] Relinquished appointment of OO Southern Command 19 December 1930. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,”  969.

[12] Released 19 December 1930  “Defence Cuts.”

[13] Appointed Ordnance Officer Southern Command 31 January 1931 “Appointments, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers of the NZ Forces “.

[14] Appointed Officer in Charge Burnham Camp in addition to Ordnance Officer Appointment 20 December 1930. “Appointment, Promotions, Transfers and Retirements of Officers from the NZ Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 70  (1931).

[15],from December 20 1930  John J. Storey and J. Halket Millar, March Past : A Review of the First Fifty Years of Burnham Camp (Christchurch, N.Z. : Pegasus Press, 1973, 1974 printing, 1973), Non-fiction, 118.

[16] “Attitude of Members “, New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVII, Issue 20644, 16 August 1930.

[17] “Big Cut in Defence Force,” Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 144,, 16 December 1930.

[18] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces June 1930 to May 1931.”

[19] “Obituary Ssgt Tennyson,” Evening Star, Issue 20543, 23 July 1930.

[20] “Mount Cook Barracks,” Evening Post, Volume CX, Issue 105, , 31 October 1930.

[21] “Defence Cuts.”

[22] “Big Cut in Defence Force.”

[23] “Defence Cuts.”

[24] “Big Cut in Defence Force.”

[25] “Defence Cuts.”

[26] Ibid.


NZAOC June 1929 to May 1930 

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC on 31st May 1930 was 120 consisting of;[1] [2] [3]

  • 8 Officers
  • 104 Permanent Other Ranks
  • 7 Temporary Other Ranks

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W.R Burge, MC, NZSC

Ordnance Accounting Officer

  • Lieutenant T.W Page, NZAOC.[1]

Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W. M. Bell, NZAOC.

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain F. E. Ford, NZAOC

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W.R Burge, MC, NZSC

Southern Command Ordnance Depot

  • Captain A.R.C White, NZAOC

Inspecting Officer Ordnance and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Major W Ivory, RNZA

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Assistant Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant I. R. Withell, RNZA

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition

  • Lieutenant M.J Lyons
NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1930

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1930

Ordnance Depots

Northern Command Camp

All construction work was completed, and the buildings handed over to the Army.[4] [5]

Central Command Camp

The buildings, roads, etc in this area were maintained in good order, and a contract was let to paint a number of the buildings.[6]

Southern Command

An ordnance workshop was erected during the year, and the area kept in good order. [7]

Personnel Movements -June 1929 to May 1930

Promotions

  • 967 Corporal R.J Gamble to Sergeant 1 July 1929

Releases

  • 1009 Lance Corporal John Campbell Myers, 30 Sept 1930

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes:

[1] Retired 29 July 1929 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 58  (1930).

[1] “Bibliographic Details,” The Evening Post, Evening Post, Volume CIX, Issue 88, 14 April 1930.

[2] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1930).

[3] “B-07 Appropriations Chargeable on the Consolidated Fund and Other Accounts for the Year Ending 31 March 1930,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1930).

[4] “Modern Military Camp,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVI, Issue 20324, 3 August 1929.

[5] “H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces.”

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.


NZAOC June 1928 to May 1929

Personnel

The strength of the NZAOC on 31st May 1929 was 122 consisting of;[1] [2]

  • 8 Officers
  • 107 Permanent Other Ranks
  • 7 Temporary Other Ranks

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC.[3]

Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer

  • Captain W.R Burge, MC, NZSC.[4] [5]

Ordnance Accounting Officer

  • Lieutenant T.W Page, NZAOC

Ordnance Officers

  • Captain W. M. Bell, NZAOC.[6] [7]
  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge NZAOC.[8] [9]

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain F. E. Ford, NZAOC.

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain H. H. Whyte, M.C, NZAOC.[10] [11]
  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge NZAOC.[12] [13]
  • Captain W.R Burge, MC, NZSC.[14]

Southern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain A.R.C White, NZAOC.

Inspecting Officer Ordnance and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Major W Ivory, RNZA.

Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer

  • Lieutenant I.R Withell, RNZA.[15] [16]

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition

  • Lieutenant M.J Lyons

 

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1929

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1929

Enlistments

To make good the normal wastage due to retirements, discharges, etc 10 Other Ranks were enlisted into the NZAOC during this year.[17]

Artillery Artificers

Artillery Artificers were transferred to the NZAOC during 1929.

Dalton JW 07a 1928

Ordnance Depots

Northern Command

Ngaruawahia Camp

Construction of the Small-arms Ammunition Magazine, magazines Nos. 8, 9, and 10 (for high explosives) Ordnance Workshops was completed. The erection of the laboratory was still to be completed.[18] [19]

Mount Eden

With the removal of stores to Ngaruawahia Camp, the buildings at Mount Eden were no longer required, so they were disassembled and re-erected at Narrow Neck Camp.[20]

Central Command

The Upper Hutt water-supply now served this camp in lieu of the previous camp system, the fire-fighting facilities had been considerably strengthened and some economy in maintenance effected. The buildings and roads had been maintained in good order.[21]

Southern Command

A concrete strong-room and Ordnance Workshops had been erected, and the buildings and the surrounding area generally maintained.[22]

Accounting irregularities

Early in 1929 the DOS identified some irregularities in connection with the sale of rifles and invited the Audit Department to investigate the matter. The result of the investigation identified that contrary to the provision of instructions relating to the Accounting of Stores Captain Whyte had;

  • Sold stores on credit contrary to instructions from superiors
  • Concealed the transactions by tampering with the documentation and ordering a NCO to produce doctored packing lists
  • Cashed cheques received as payment for Government stores that were endorsed as payable to “The Director of Ordnance Services or Bearer” and used the proceeds for his own purposes.

A disturbing breach of procedures Captain Whyte was questioned about the irregularities identified by the Audit report and with all the outstanding amounts repaid was given the opportunity of resigning his commission or facing disciplinary action.  Captain Whyte took the opportunity of resigning his commission resulting in a loss of accrued leave and benefits.

Examinations for Promotions

The 1928 examinations for promotion were conducted in all Depots on the following dates;

  • Monday 19 November -Technical – Armament Section
  • Monday 19 November – Technical – Stores Section
  • Monday 19 November – Technical – Ammunition Section
  • Tuesday 20 November – Technical – Clerical Section
  • Wednesday 21 November – Arithmetic – All Sections
  • Thursday 22 November 1928 – Accounting for Stores – All Sections Staff Sergeant and above
  • Friday 23 November 1928 – Discipline – All Sections Staff Sergeant and above

Courses

A course of Instruction for Armourers was held at the Main Ordnance Depot in Trentham over the period 4-22 January 1929, attending were;

  • 14 Armourer Sergeant Major B Buckley (Trentham)
  • 2 Armourer SQMS J.A Adamson (Burnham)
  • 132 Armourer Staff Sergeant A.P Young (Trentham)
  • 915 Armourer Staff Sergeant E.J Hunter (Trentham)
  • 25 Armourer Sergeant F.A Clapshaw (Burnham)
  • 7 Armourer Corporal R.C Austin (Burnham)
  • 992 Armourer Corporal H.C Cooper (Trentham)
  • 141 Armourer Corporal R.S H Lyons (Trentham)

The following passed and became eligible for promotion to the next highest rank;

  • 915 Armourer Staff Sergeant E.J Hunter (Trentham) 79% eligible for promotion to Armourer SQMS
  • 25 Armourer Sergeant F.A Clapshaw (Burnham) 78% eligible for promotion to Armourer Staff Sergeant
  • 7 Armourer Corporal R.C Austin (Burnham) 77% eligible for promotion to Armourer Sergeant
  • 992 Armourer Corporal H.C Cooper (Trentham) 72% eligible for promotion to Armourer Sergeant

Personnel Movements -June 1928 to May 1929

Enlistments

  • 1024 Armament-Artificer E.W Jepson
  • 1025 Tent-Repairer-Artificer H.R Griffin into “D Section” of the Permanent Section of the NZAOC
  • 1026 Private J.S Jefcoate into “B Section” of the Permanent Section of the NZAOC
  • 1027 Artificer W.C Brizzel into “D Section” of the Permanent Section of the NZAOC
  • 1028 Private P.N Erridge into “A Section” Burnham of the Permanent Section of the NZAOC

Postings

  • 35 Lance Corporal H Ekins from “E Section” Trentham Detachment to “F Section” Wellington Detachment.
  • 363 SQMS D.L Lewis from Burnham to Trentham in September 1928
  • 915 Armourer Staff Sergeant J.A Kenning from Trentham to Ngaruawahia
  • Sergeant Peterson from Trentham to Ngaruawahia
  • Corporal P Henry from Trentham to Ngaruawahia
  • 996 Lance Corporal A.G McCurdy from Trentham to Ngaruawahia
  • 1009 Lance Corporal J.L Myers from “F Section” Trentham to “A Section” Burnham
  • 7574586 Armourer Staff Sergeant R.R Grieve from Northern Command to Trentham

Promotions

  • 363 SQMS D.L Lewis to Warrant Officer Class 1 (Conductor) on 1 October 1928
  • 894 Staff Sergeant J Moroney to SQMS 1 October 1928
  • 951 SQMS A Martin to Warrant Officer Class 1 on 15 of September 1928
  • 989 Lance Corporal P.R Hunter to Corporal on the 19th of January 1929
  • 1002 Lance Corporal S.P Stewart to Corporal 1 March 1929
  • 1026 Private J.S Jefcoate to Armament-Sergeant on the 13th of December 1928

Appointments

  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge NZAOC, appointed Ordnance Officer. Main Depot, Trentham and Ordnance Officer Central Military Command from 14 May 1929.[23]

Transfers

  • Capitan W.M Bell from the reserve of Officers to the NZAOC with the rank of Capitan with seniority to 1 August 1919. To be Ordnance Officer Main Ordnance Depot and Office in Charge Trentham Camp from 15 March 1929.[24]
  • Captain W.C Burge, New Zealand Staff Corps seconded to NZAOC as Assistant Chief Ordnance Officer from 18 April 1929.[25] [26]
  • Lieutenant I. R. Withell, RNZA seconded to NZAOC as Assistant Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Ordnance Mechanical Engineer from 16 May 1929[27] [28]

Releases

  • 1 Private Hugh John Adams
  • 17 Armament Staff Quartermaster Sargent George Bush, MSM
  • 995 Staff Sergeant Wilfred Robert White
  • 102 Armourer Staff Quartermaster-Sergeant Harold Victor Coyte Reynolds, MSM
  • 951 SQMS A Martin
  • Captain H. H. Whyte, M.C., NZAOC

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes:

[1] “”H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces. June 1928 to May 1929,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1929).

[2] “B-07 Appropriations Chargeable on the Consolidated Fund and Other Accounts for the Year Ending 31 March 1929,” Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives  (1929): 136-37.

[3] Major J.S Bolton, A History of the Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (Trentham: RNZAOC, 1992).

[4]  Appointed Assistant COO 18 April 1929 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 48, 27 June 1929, 1761.

[5] “New Zealand Army,” Evening Post, Volume CVII, Issue 150, 29 June 1929.

[6]Appointed 15 March 1929 was also Officer in Charge Trentham Military Camp. “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,”  1761.

[7] “New Zealand Army.”

[8] Appointed 14 May 1929.”Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,”  1761.

[9] “New Zealand Army.”

[10] “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,” New Zealand Gazette No 25, 11 April 1929.

[11] “Personal Items,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 19840, 10 January 1928.

[12] Appointed 14 May 1929.”Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,”  1761.

[13] “New Zealand Army.”

[14] Appointed Command Ordnance Officer 18 April 1929. The War Office, The Monthly Army List, February 1939 (London: His Majestys Stationary Office, 1939).

[15] Appointed 16 May 1929 “Appointments, Promotions, Resignations and Transfer of Officers of the New Zealand Military Forces,”  1761.

[16] “New Zealand Army.”

[17] “”H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces. June 1928 to May 1929.”

[18] “Large Miitary Camp,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 20093, 2 November 1928.

[19] “”H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces. June 1928 to May 1929.”

[20] “Tenders,” Auckland Star, Volume LX, Issue 28, Page 7 Advertisements Column 2, 2 February 1929.

[21] “”H-19 Defence Forces of New Zealand, Annual Report of the General Officer Commanding the Forces. June 1928 to May 1929.”

[22] Ibid.

[23] “New Zealand Army.”

[24] Ibid.

[25] “Personal,” Poverty Bay Herald, Volume LV, Issue 16908, 23 March 1929.

[26] “New Zealand Army.”

[27] “Navy and Army Gossip,” Evening Star, Issue 20176, 16 May 1929.

[28] “New Zealand Army.”


 NZAOC June 1927 to May 1928

Personnel

The Strength of the NZAOC on the 31st of May 1928 was 118, consisting of;

  • 8 Officers
  • 103 Permanent Other Ranks
  • 7 Temporary Other Ranks

Key Appointments

Director of Ordnance Services

  • Major Thomas Joseph King, NZAOC

Ordnance Accounting Officer

  • Lieutenant T.W Page, NZAOC

Ordnance Officer (Provision)

  • Lieutenant H. E. Erridge, NZAOC

Northern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain F. E. Ford, NZAOC

Central Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain H. H. Whyte, M.C, NZAOC.

Southern Command Ordnance Officer

  • Captain A.R.C White, NZAOC

Inspecting Ordnance Officer and Acting Inspector of Ordnance Machinery

  • Captain W. Ivory, RNZA,

Proof Officer, Small Arms Ammunition

  • Captain E.H Sawle.
  • Lieutenant M.J Lyons

Enlistments

To make good wastage due to retirements, Six Other Ranks were enlisted into the NZAOC during this year.

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1928

NZAOC appropriations year ending 31 March 1928

Ordnance Depots

Northern Command

The development of Ngaruawahia Camp was now in its final stages. During the year the large Ordnance Store building had been completed, and the stores from the Ordnance Depot at Mount Eden were being transferred to it. Two additional short railway-sidings: one off the main siding, and one off the Ordnance Depot siding, to facilitate sorting of trucks and disposal of empties had also been completed. The Ordnance Office was in use, while the Ordnance workshop and small-arms-ammunition magazine areas were approaching completion. Four married quarters for Ordnance personnel were erected and completed during the year. Two high-explosive magazines were completed with an additional three high-explosive magazines and laboratory, and the provision of mains and equipment for fire-prevention nearing completion.[1] [2]

Central Command

At Trentham Camp, minor improvements had been undertaken, and the electrical change-over enabling the independent-power plant to be dispensed with was completed. Roads in the camp were receiving attention, while the numerous wooden buildings had been painted and otherwise maintained in good order.

Southern Command

Burnham Camp had been maintained, and the water-supply system completed.

Personnel Movements -June 1927 to May 1928

Transfers into the NZAOC

  • 1018 Sergeant Major James Oliver Pringle Southgate.[3]

Enlistments

  • 1014 Wheeler Artificer R.S.V Rowe.[4]
  • 1016 Private E.W Hughes.[5]
  • 1017 Private L.H Stroud. [6]
  • 1019 Private E.G Lake.[7]

Releases

  • Captain E. H. Sawle,
  • Captain A. J. Cheater

Copyright © Robert McKie 2018

Notes:

[1] “Land Defence,” Auckland Star, Volume LVIII, Issue 181, 3 August 1927.

[2] “Camp at Hopuhopu,” New Zealand Herald, Volume LXV, Issue 19875,, 20 February 1928.

[3] Transferred into NZAOC from RNZA 1 January 1928. “Southgate,James Oliver Pringle,” Personal File, Archives New Zealand  (1914-1918).

[4] Enlisted 14 June 1927

[5] Enlisted 8 September 1927

[6] Enlisted 25 October 1927

[7] Enlisted 13 September 1927