Zeitoun Ordnance Cap Badge Mystery

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New Zealand Supply Depot Staff at Zeitoun Camp, 1915. National Army Museum of New Zealand

I was recently made aware of this photo of New Zealand Supply Depot Staff at Zeitoun Camp, Egypt in 1915, it has been taken from the album of Major Alexander Charters, CMG, DSO, of the Wellington Infantry Battalion. The picture shows a group of men, most likely of the No 1 Depot Unit of Supply (DUS) New Zealand Army Service Corps (NZASC).

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Badges of the NZASC 1910-1947. Robert McKie collection

Based at Zeitoun Camp from August 1915 until 16 March 1916 No 1 DUS was responsible for the supply and distribution of over 28000000 Kilograms of forage, foodstuffs, firewood and other goods to its subordinate units during that time.  It is on the surface an unremarkable picture but shows the variety of head-wear and uniforms at the time. Most are wearing Wolseley pattern sun helmets, two are wearing Forage Caps, two individuals are wearing felt hats with NZASC Khaki/White/Khaki Puggaree, one is wearing a Mounted Rifles bandoleer. Most interestingly of all is an individual wearing Lemon Squeezer hat,  with an unidentified Puggaree, (most likely an infantry Puggaree) with a British Army Ordnance Corps (AOC) badge.

The question has to be asked, why is a New Zealand soldier in 1915 wearing a British Army Ordnance Corps badge?

At the time of the photo, New Zealand did not have an Ordnance Corps, and one would not be formally created in the NZEF until February 1916,  (see NZAOC 1916-1919) and at home until 1917. (NZAOC, 1917-1923)   In the context of the NZEF,  ad-hoc Ordnance Sections had been established as staff under the New Zealand Division Deputy Assistant Director of Ordnance Services(DADOS). On the arrival of the NZ advance party in 1914, Sergeant (later Major) Levien had been attached to the British Ordnance Corps Depot at the Citadel in Cairo to study the Ordnance systems in use with the Imperial forces in Egypt to integrate New Zealand into the British Supply System.

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Rue de la, Porte Rosette, Alexandria, Egypt. Public Domain

Early in 1915 to support the Zealand Forces, Levien now promoted to Lieutenant established a New Zealand Ordnance Depot in Alexandra at No. 12 Rue de la, Porte Rosette and a warehouse at Shed 43, Alexandra Docks.

Given the need to outfit New Zealand units as they arrived in Egypt, and as the New Zealand Forces returned from Gallipoli, there would have been a significant effort to refit, refurbish and re-equip units as they reorganised for future service in France and the Middle East. This would have put a considerable strain onto the nascent New Zealand Ordnance Corps, requiring in addition to the original DADOS staff, the drafting in of additional soldiers with clerical, stores and maintenance experience from within NZEF. Records analysed so far identify 13 Other Ranks (Private to Company Sergeant Major), who joined the NZAOC on its formal creation in Feb/Mar 1916, who would have quite possibly been working in  Ordnance roles since 1915.

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Ordnance Member, New Zealand Supply Depot Staff at Zeitoun Camp, and was definitely taken in 1915. National Army Museum of New Zealand

Unlike the soldiers of the NZASC who deployed as part of the established NZASC organisation and wore the NZASC cap badge.  Soldiers posted to NZ Ordnance, deployed from NZ on the strength of the unit or Battalion that they had enlisted into and were posted to the Ordnance establishment after their arrival in Egypt, and before establishment of the NZAOC in Feb 1916 would have retained the cap badge of their parent unit. I am sure that this would have caused some confusion and based on the evidence of the Zeitoun photo at least one Ordnance soldier utilised a British AOC badges to identify himself as Ordnance.

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UK Army Ordnance Corps Badge 1895-1918. Robert McKie Collection

 

 

Judging by the puggaree on this soldiers lemon squeezer hat, this soldier has transferred to Ordnance from one of the New Zealand Infantry Battalions and quite possibly retains his parent units collar badges. Unfortunately, the quality of the picture doesn’t provide enough detail to identify the group with any certainty.

This picture raises several questions.

  • Was this an officially endorsed dress embellishment to identify individuals employed in Ordnance roles, possibly with the endorsement of the British Ordnance establishment in Egypt?
  • Was it just a case of an individual employed in an Ordnance role using the renowned Kiwi initiative and acquiring an AOC badge to show that he was Ordnance?
  • Was it just an ASC soldier, displaying an AOC badge he had just swapped as a keepsake? (by all accounts a thriving trade causing a shortage of badges)
  • Was it, in fact, a British Ordnance Soldier, wearing an acquired lemon Squeezer?
  • In 1914 there were several British Army Ordnance Corps Armourers posted to Alexandra barracks at Mount Cook in Wellington, are they part of this mystery, did some of these Armourers deploy with the NZEF to the Middle East?
  • Does the use of its badge have its origins back to 1913 when the first Ordnance Depots were established for the New Zealand Territorial Amy annual camps, and this individual was one of the original members?

Until further photographic evidence or written documentation is discovered, this picture raises more questions than answers, but this photo does provide a start point for later research to unravel this cap badge mystery.  I have seen some examples this badge with the letters “NZ” affixed on top of the shield, are these modified badges part of the same story?

Eventually, the NZAOC in the NZEF would adopt its own badge either in 1916/1917 and on the creation of the Home Service NZAOC in 1917 the adoption of their own badge. Use of both badges would evolve several times into the 1955 pattern that would serve the RNZAOC until 1996.

 

Copyright © Robert McKie 2017

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New Zealand Supply Depot Staff at Zeitoun Camp, 1915 (Colourised). National Army Museum of New Zealand


New Zealand Ordnance buttons, an introduction

Military buttons are as varied as cap badges. It was not uncommon for individual Regiments or Corps to have their own unique regimental button, and the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps was no exception with buttons featuring the Ordnance Crest between 1917 and 1996

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Button Background

Uniform Button Sizes & Types

Military buttons, specifically those used by the United Kingdom, New Zealand and other Commonwealth nations fall into 3 size categories:

  • Small – about 14mm diameter and used for caps, mess dress waistcoats (vests) and gorgets (red or blue tabs worn by Staff Officers on the collar).
  • Medium – about 19mm diameter and used on pockets and shoulder straps (epaulettes) of most parade uniforms and service dress.
  • Large – about 25mm diameter and used on great-coats and Service Dress jackets.

Button Ligne – the traditional way of measuring buttons

As with many military items, buttons have their own system of measurement, which is known as ‘Lines’ or ‘Lignes’, where the diameter of buttons is measured, and the measurement in Lignes equates as 40L = 1 inch = 25.4 millimetres. The common Lignes are;

  • 14L – 9mm
  • 16L – 10mm
  • 18L – 11.5mm
  • 20L – 13mm
  • 22L – 14mm
  • 24L – 15mm
  • 26L – 16mm
  • 30L – 19mm
  • 32L – 20mm
  • 36L – 23mm
  • 40L – 25mm
  • 44L – 28mm
  • 48L – 30mm

New Zealand Ordnance Buttons

So Far I have identified seven different types of Buttons used by the New Zealand Ordnance Corps from 1917

  • Brass 1911 New Zealand Forces button
  • Brass New Zealand Army Ordnance Department, 1917-1924,
  • Brass New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps circa 1917-1924,
  • Brass New Zealand Ordnance Corps, possibly 1924-47,
  • Brass New Zealand Army Ordnance pre-1953,
  • Gilt Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, 1947-1955,
  • Anodised Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, 1955- 1996.

The dates listed were not the actual dates when the buttons were in service, but the period that the particular iteration of the Ordnance Corps was in existence. It could be assumed that some buttons remained in service after newer versions were introduced.

Brass 1911 New Zealand Forces button

The first New Zealand Ordnance Soldiers wore the standard New Zealand Forces buttons which had been introduced in 1911. There is much photographic evidence of these buttons been worn by both the NZEF NZAOC and the home service NZAOC. The 1911 button would fade from general use as individual brass and later anodised buttons came into use for each different regiment and Corps. The 1911 Button would make a reappearance in widespread use in the late 1990s as all individual corps buttons were wasted out and replaced the modern anodised version of the 1911 button.

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New Zealand Forces Button 1911. Robert McKie Collection

Brass New Zealand Army Ordnance Department

Gazetted by regulations published on 1 February 1917, the New Zealand Army Ordnance Department (NZAOD) was established as part of the permanent staff of the Defence Forces of New Zealand and consisted only of Officers.

Manufactured by Hobson & Sons of London and Extra Super, NZAOD buttons are brass, embossed with an ordnance shield of three cannons, instead of the standard three cannonballs there are two stars in their place with the letters NZ in between. The shield is mounted with a Kings (Tudor) crown and has the words “Army Ordnance Department” circling the shield.

The NZAOD was combined with the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps in 1923, but given that the larger Ligne sizes are relatively common they probably remained in use for several years after 1923.

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New Zealand Army Ordnance Department, 1917-1924. Robert McKie Collection

Brass New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps Circa

Gazetted by regulations published on 1 February 1917, the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (NZAOC) was established as part of the permanent staff of the Defence Forces of New Zealand and consisted of Warrant Officers, Non Commissioned Officers and other ranks.

Manufactured by J.R Gaunt & Sons and Firmin, both of London, the NZAOC buttons are brass, embossed with an ordnance shield of three cannons, instead of the standard three cannonballs there are two stars in their place with the letters NZ in between. The shield is mounted with a Kings (Tudor) crown and has the words “Army Ordnance Corps” circling the shield.

As with the NZAOD button, the larger Ligne sizes of this are relatively common they probably remained in use for several years after 1923.

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New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, 1917-1924. Robert McKie Collection

Brass New Zealand Ordnance Corps

Manufactured by J.R Gaunt & Sons of London the New Zealand Ordnance Corps buttons are brass and are embossed with an ordnance shield of three cannons, with the standard three cannonballs in the top part of the shield. The shield is mounted with a Kings (Tudor) crown and has the words “New Zealand Ordnance Corps” circling the shield.

At present little is known about the history of this pattern button, and it could have been utilised anytime between 1917 and 1955.

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New Zealand Ordnance Corps. Robert McKie Collection

Brass Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps 1948-1953

Manufactured by J.R Gaunt & Sons of London the Royal New Zealand Ordnance Corps buttons are brass and are embossed with a badge similar in pattern to the 1947-55 RNZAOC badge with a Kings (Tudor) crown and NZ between the Garter and Riband. The normal wording “Honi Soit Oui Mal Y Pense” is not included in the Garter, but a series of large and small dots have been included where the usual script would be.

At present little is known about the history of this pattern button, and it could have been utilised anytime between 1948 and 1955.

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Brass Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps 1948-1955. Robert McKie collection

Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, Gilt Mess Buttons

On the 6th of May 1948, an order was placed on the United Kingdom for 600 anodised aluminium buttons of the pattern illustrated in the following picture.

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Anodised Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps buttons

Introduced post-1954 the Aluminium Anodised buttons were manufactured by a variety of manufactures including Gaunt and Firmin and would remain in service until the disbandment of the RNZAOC in 1996. The button has the badge of the RNZAOC, with the St Edwards Crown embossed onto the button. Compared to the brass buttons of earlier times they are unremarkable and in my opinion cheaper looking.

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Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, 1955-1996. Robert McKie Collection

British Ordnance Buttons

The following British Ordnance buttons are quite common in New Zealand, and as with Ordnance badges share many standard design features;

Army Ordnance Department 1896 – 1901

RAOC BUTTON 1

Army Ordnance Department 1896 – 1901 Robert McKie Collection

Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1918 – 1949

RAOC BUTTON 2

Royal Army Ordnance Corps 1918 – 1949 Robert McKie Collection

Manufactures Marks

Located on the rear of the button, manufacturer marks identify the various button manufactures that produced buttons for the NZ Army over the last 100 years, of which some examples are shown below.

Copyright © Robert McKie 2017


In the period of its existence Between 1916 and 1996, the badges of the New Zealand Army Ordnance services progressed through many transitions. Each time, as with other Commonwealth armies, following the design of the insignia of the parent Royal Army Ordnance Corps (RAOC). With the final badge culminating in a design consisting of the following elements:

  • The Crown
    • Kings (Tudor) crown on the Badges for 1937 to 1955
    • Queens (St Edwards) Crown on all subsequent badges

 

 

 

 

  • Annulus
    • On the 1937-47 pattern Badge, annulus inscribed with the words “New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps
  •  Garter,
    • From 1948 the annulus was replaced with the royal garter inscribed with the motto of the British Order of the Garter ‘Honi soit qui mal y pense’.
  • Riband, The Riband has had Many variations since 1916 all depending on the pattern of the badge common inscriptions, including;
    • Ordnance
    • Army Ordnance Dept
    • Army Ordnance Corps
    • Sua Tela Tonanti
  • Shield. The Ordnance shield of three cannons and three cannonballs is a constant aspect of all patterns of NZ Ordnance Badges.

Collar badges were miniatures of the cap badge, coming in pairs with the cannons facing both left and right. Between 1917 and 1923 the NZAOC and NZAOD used the same collar badge.
Up to 1955 Badges were usually manufactured by the Die Stamping process in Brass or Bronze, with Officers Gilt, Silver and Enamel badges produced from 1937. From 1955 the standard badges were produced in anodised aluminium.

Evolution of the Ordnance badgeTHE BADGES

Pre-war

Before the 1st World War, there was no Ordnance Organisation in the New Zealand Army, responsibility for Ordnance services were split between the Defence Stores Department, a civilian organisation and the Royal New Zealand Artillery.
Need for an Ordnance Organisation has been identified as early as 1907. It was not until the annual camps of 1913 that as part of a proof of concept trial temporary Ordnance Store Depots were established. The nucleus of an Ordnance Corps formed by the training of specific men from within the Territorial Army in a knowledge of Ordnance duties. This was a temporary arrangement established under the Director of Equipment and Stores for each Annual camp from 1913, and it is unknown if any unique insignia was adopted for the personnel working in these Ordnance Stores Depots.

1st World War

On the outbreak of the 1st World War, records show that Ordnance Depots were formed as part of the mobilisation and probably manned with the individuals trained in Ordnance duties in the previous Annual camps. Some individuals such as Temporary Sergeant Norman Levien transferred from the strength of the 3rd Auckland Regiment into the Ordnance Department as the IC of Stores and Equipment and assisted in equipping the troops for overseas service. Levien would remain with the Ordnance Services for the duration of the war attaining the rank of Major as the Chief Ordnance Officer for the NZEF.

NZ Army Ordnance Section

Conceived as an economic measure due to the tyranny of distance from traditional sources of supply, and the shortfalls caused by the 1914–19 war, it was decided to create an Ordnance Section to inspect and manufacture artillery ammunition. Established on 1 April 1915, the Army Ordnance Section of the NZ Army and located at Fort Balance in Wellington. Part of the Royal New Zealand Artillery organisation, the Ordnance Section wore the badge of the Royal New Zealand Artillery.

NZEF New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps 1916-1919

The New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (NZAOC) had existed as an ad-hoc organisation of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force (NZEF) since mobilisation in 1914. Formally established as a unit of NZEF in February 1916, it is unknown when insignia was adopted for the NZAOC. The insignia that was adopted followed the pattern of the existing British Army Ordnance Department (AOD) badge.

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Army Ordnance Department. 1895-1918. Robert McKie Collection

The NZEF NZAOC badge was merely the UK Army Ordnance Department (AOD) Badge with the letters “NZ” mounted on top of the shield. Its design, probably influenced by the insignia of the Canadian Army Ordnance Corps (CAOC), The CAOC had in 1903 adopted a badge based on the UK AOD badge, with a Beaver on the crest to provide the desired national distinction.

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Canadian Ordnance Corps badge, 1903-1922. Robert McKie collection

 

It is unknown what the process was that lead to the introduction of the NZAOC badge. In late 1916 Levien, Promoted to Captain was appointed Chief Ordnance Officer for the NZEF in the UK and through his interactions with all the other Commonwealth Ordnance Services, including the Canadians it is possible that the Canadian badge was a significant influence on the design of the New Zealand badge.

Existing examples of the NZEF NZAOC Badge were manufactured by J R Gaunt of London. The Badges were produced by the die stamping process, with the NZ was sweated on, which leads to the assumption that; either surplus UK AOD badges were used, or new badges were made using new dies.
Matching Collar badges were produced and were miniatures of the cap badge, in pairs with the cannons facing inwards.

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New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps Badge, 1916-1919 (Robert McKie Collection 2017)

This Badge was possibly introduced in late 1916 and was utilised until the demobilisation of the NZEF in 1919, with some individuals carrying out residual duties in the UK continuing to wear it until 1921. Unused stocks were returned to New Zealand as part of the NZEF demobilisation.

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Major Gossage, DADOS  HQ NZ Division Leverkusen, Germany Feb 1919.

Variations of the NZEF NZAOC Badge

Examples of the NZEF NZAOC Badge with matching collar badges can be found in;

  • Brass, and
  • Bronze.

It appears from the NZEF Badge remained in use by some NZAOC members with NZEF NZAOC service, with for example in the following picture from 1934 with  Armament Staff Sargent Arthur Stewart Richardson wearing the NZEF pattern Badge and Armament Staff Sargent John William(Bill) Dalton wearing the 1917 pattern badge.

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Armament Staff Sergeant John William(Bill) Dalton and Armament Staff Sergeant Arthur Stewart Richardson, Artillery camp, Waipukurau March 1934. Photo courtesy Norm Lamont

Home Service New Zealand Army Ordnance Department and Corps 1917-1923

Gazetted by regulations published on 1 February 1917 The New Zealand Army Ordnance Department (NZAOD) was the organisation of commissioned officers while the New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps (NZAOC) was the organisation of comprised the Warrant Officers, NCOs and men. Both agencies were responsible for the supply, maintenance and repair of equipment, small arms and all stores required for the Defence Force from 1917 to 1924.

New Zealand Army Ordnance Department Badge 1917-1924

The NZAOD badge was based on the UK Army Ordnance Corps (AOC) insignia.
The New Zealand version modified the UK AOC badge by Having the letters NZ replace the centre cannonball in the top panel of the shield and with the inscriptions Army Ordnance Department on the scroll beneath the shield.

The Collar badge was a simple version of the Cap badge without the scroll with the cannons facing inwards

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UK Army Ordnance Corps 1895-1918. Robert McKie collection

 

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New Zealand Army Ordnance Department badge 1917-1924. Robert McKie collection

Variations of the NZAOD 1917-1924 Badge

Examples of the NZAOD 1917-1924 Badge show that this badge was only produced in Brass.

New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps Badge 1917-1937

The home service NZAOC badge was possibly based on the UK Army Ordnance Department badge. The New Zealand version modified the UK AOD badge by Having the letters NZ replace the centre cannonball in the top panel of the shield and with the inscriptions Army Ordnance Department on the scroll beneath the shield.

This New Zealand Pattern Ordnance Corps Badge is unique in the world as it is one of the few Ordnance cap badges where the cannons face in the opposite direction to all other ordnance badges.

The Collar badge was a simple version of the Cap badge without the scroll with the cannons facing inwards.

When the New Zealand Army Ordnance Department was absorbed into the  New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps in 1924, the NZAOC badge remained in use as the Corps badge until 1937.

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Army Ordnance Department. 1895-1918. Robert McKie Collection

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New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps badge 1917-1937. Robert McKie Collection

 

 

Variations of the NZAOC 1917-1937 Badge

Examples of the NZAOC 1917-1937 Badge can be found in;

  • Brass, and
  • Bronze

New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps    1937-1947

20170712_142252By 1936, stocks of the 1917 pattern Cap badge had been exhausted, with only collar badges remaining in stock. The Director of Ordnance Services of the time proposed to the Quartermaster General that existing stock of the NZEF NZAOC badge (180 Cap Badges, 319 Pairs of Collar Badges) be used as a replacement, and the current badge be made obsolete.  The Quartermaster General did not authorise the replacement of the 1917 Badge but did allow the use of the NZEF NZAOC Badge until the provision of new badges could be arranged from the UK.20170712_142340

 

The Director of Ordnance Services counted with a proposal in February 1937  which had been chosen by a competition held within the NZAOC. The winning design by Sergeant C Bryant was an interpretation of the RAOC badge of the time.  The New Zealand Badge differed from the RAOC version by having the Inscription “New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps” in the Annulus field, and the inscription “Sua Tela Tonanti” in the Riband. The new design was approved on the 31st of May 1937.

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RAOC Badge 1918-1947

Variations of the NZAOC 1937-1947 Badge

Examples of the NZAOC 1937-1947 Badge can be found with matching collar badges in the following finishes;

  • Brass,
  • Bronze,
  • Plastic, and
  • Gilt Silver and Enamel
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New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, Officer Gilt, Silver and Enamel Badge. 1937-1947, Robert McKie Collection.

 

RNZAOC hat and collar 1937-1947

New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps,1937-1947. Robert McKie collection

(This picture illustrates the Brass OR’s Cap badge and Officers Bronze Collar Badge)

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Plastic New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps,1937-1947. Robert McKie collection

New Zealand Ordnance Corps 1940-1947

With the massive expansion of the Home army in 1940, the New Zealand Ordnance Corps (NZOC) was formally constituted as a stand-alone Corps in December 1940. The NZOC was the Ordnance element of the New Zealand Territorial Army and was tasked with home defence and as a feeder for the Expeditionary Forces.
In 1947 a Reorganization of New Zealand Military Forces removed the distinction between Regular and non-Regular soldiers, and the NZOC ceased to be a separate Corps, becoming part of the NZAOC.

20181108_082848600934995.jpgThe earlier NZEF NZAOC badge was utilised as the badge for the NZOC; Photographic evidence suggests that only the Cap badge was used.
The badge was produced in both Brass and bronze as a complete piece by the die stamp process.

Variations of the NZOC 1940-1947 Badge

Examples of the NZOC 1940-1947 Badge can be found in Brass and Bronze.

1947

New Zealand Army Ordnance, Christchurch. 1947. Archives New Zealand Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanatanga, Christchurch R1309080

Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps 1947-1955

On 12 July 1947 the NZAOC was granted Royal status, an adopted a new badge.
Mounted with a Kings (Tudor) crown, the new RNZAOC badge had in the Garter the inscription ‘Honi soit qui mal y pense’, the letters NZ below the Garter surrounded by the Riband with the inscription ‘Sua Tela Tonanti’.
The Badge was produced in Brass, with a Gilt, Silver and Enamel badge available for officer use.

The Design for the new Badge was approved on 27 October 1947 and orders placed on 14 January 1948 from;

  • United Kingdom;
    • 175 Gilt, Silver and Enamel cap badges,
    • 158 Pairs Gilt, Silver and Enamel cap collar badges.
  • New Zealand;
    • 1600 Brass cap badges,
    • 850 Pairs Brass collar badges
RNZAOC hat and collar 1947-55

Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps 1947-55 badge (Robert McKie Collection 2017)

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Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, Officer Gilt, Silver and Enamel Badge. 1947-1955, Robert McKie Collection.

In 1947 NZ Army Order 36/1947 authorised that a 2 inch Diamond patch was to be worn on the Cap GS or Beret as a backing to Corps cap badges. The patch for Ordnance was Red and Blue (vertical), an example is shown below.

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Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, 47-55 Badge with Ordnance diamond backing patch. Robert McKie collection

Variations of the RNZAOC 1947-1955 Badge

Examples of the RNZAOC 1947-1955 Badge with matching collar badges can be found in;

  • Brass, and
  • Gilt Silver and Enamel.

Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps 1955-1996

With the ascension of Queen Elizabeth, to the throne in 1953, the design of the RNZAOC badge was upgraded from having a Kings crown to having a Queens (St Edwards) crown.

The new design was approved in 1955 with the first anodised badges ready for issue on 31 May 1962.

The original issue of post-1955 badges were plain gilt anodised badges; these were replaced in the 1970’s by a coloured anodised version.

Variations of the RNZAOC 1955-1996 Badge

Examples of the RNZAOC 1955-1996 Badge with matching collar badges can be found in;

  • Plain anodised,
  • Coloured anodised
  • Gilt Silver and Enamel.
  • Bullion Woven (no collar badges)
RNZAOC GILT, annodised plain 1955-1996

Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps GILT, annodised plain 1955-1996.(Robert McKie Collection 2017)

RNZAOC GILT, annodised coloured 1955-1996

Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps GILT, annodised coloured 1955-1996 (Copyright © Robert McKie 2017)

1955-1996 GS&E Badge

Royal New Zealand Army Ordnance Corps, 1955-1996 Gilt, Silver & Enamel Officers Badge. Robert McKie collection

 

Copyright © Robert McKie 2017

Ordnance Badges of New Zealand 1916-1996